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The Study of Microbiome of the Female Genital Area in Relation to Pelvic Floor Dysfunction: A Systematic Review

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Abstract

Introduction and Hypothesis

The aim of this article is to present a systematic literature review focused on microbiome diversity in women experiencing pelvic floor dysfunction.

Methods

Utilizing PubMed/MedLine and Scopus, 25 pertinent studies were meticulously selected for this review.

Results

A key theme identified is the potential of microbiomes as diagnostic tools. The findings consistently highlight Lactobacillus as recurrent microbiota. Additionally, Gardnerella, Streptococcus, Prevotella, Aerococcus, Staphylococcus, Proteus, and Bifidobacterium species were frequently observed. This suggests the influential role of these microorganisms in shaping female urological and reproductive health. A deeper understanding of these predominant bacterial genera could offer invaluable insights into healthy physiological states and various disorders. The complex relationship between microbial compositions and diverse health conditions paves the way for novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. As we further explore the complexities of microbiomes, their role becomes increasingly crucial in transforming women's health care.

Conclusions

These findings emphasize the need for personalized care, integrating the microbiome into a comprehensive health assessment and treatment framework. This review lays the groundwork for future medical strategies where the microbiome is a pivotal element in both preventive and therapeutic care.

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Authors

Contributions

G.B.: contributed to the conception and design of the study, acquisition and analysis of data, drafting of the article, and approved the final version to be published; P.K.: significantly contributed to the design of the study, interpretation of data, revising the article critically for important intellectual content, and final approval of the version to be published; T.M.: Contributed to the acquisition of data, analysis, drafting and revising the article, and final approval of the version to be published; D.B.: assisted in data acquisition, analysis, and interpretation, participated in drafting the article, and gave final approval of the version to be published; D.C.: involved in data analysis, interpretation, critical revision of the article for key intellectual content, and approved the final version to be published.

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Correspondence to Polychronis Kostoulas.

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Balaouras, G., Kostoulas, P., Mikos, T. et al. The Study of Microbiome of the Female Genital Area in Relation to Pelvic Floor Dysfunction: A Systematic Review. Int Urogynecol J (2024). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00192-024-05821-4

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