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Translabial ultrasound assessment of the anal sphincter complex: normal measurements of the internal and external anal sphincters at the proximal, mid-, and distal levels

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to measure the internal and external anal sphincters using translabial ultrasound (TLU) at the proximal, mid, and distal levels of the anal sphincter complex. The human review committee approval was obtained and all women gave written informed consent. Sixty women presenting for gynecologic ultrasound for symptoms other than pelvic organ prolapse or urinary or anal incontinence underwent TLU. Thirty-six (60%) were asymptomatic and intact, 13 symptomatic and intact, and 11 disrupted. Anterior–posterior diameters of the internal anal sphincter at all levels and the external anal sphincter at the distal level were measured in four quadrants. Mean sphincter measurements are given for symptomatic and asymptomatic intact women and are comparable to previously reported endoanal MRI and ultrasound measurements.

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Acknowledgement

This study was supported by DHHS/NIH/GCRC grant #5M01 RR00997.

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Correspondence to Rebecca J. Hall.

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Rebecca G. Rogers is a consultant for Pfizer.

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Hall, R.J., Rogers, R.G., Saiz, L. et al. Translabial ultrasound assessment of the anal sphincter complex: normal measurements of the internal and external anal sphincters at the proximal, mid-, and distal levels. Int Urogynecol J 18, 881–888 (2007). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00192-006-0254-z

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00192-006-0254-z

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