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Computational Statistics

, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 183–193 | Cite as

A framework for statistical software development, maintenance, and publishing within an open-access business model

  • Patrick WessaEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

There are several fundamental problems with statistical software development in the academic community. In addition, the development and dissemination of academic software will become increasingly difficult due to a variety of reasons. To solve these problems, a new framework for statistical software development, maintenance, and publishing is proposed: it is based on the paradigm that academic and commercial software should be both cost-effectively created, maintained and published with Marketing Principles in mind. The framework has been seamlessly integrated into a highly successful website (http://www.wessa.net) that operates as a provider of free web-based statistical software. Finally it is explained how the R framework provides a platform for the development of a true compendium publishing system.

Keywords

Statistical software Compendium Business model 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.K. U. Leuven AssociationLouvainBelgium
  2. 2.Department of Business StudiesIntegrated Faculty of Economics, Applied Economics and Commercial SciencesLessiusBelgium

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