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A comprehensive review of tolerance analysis models

  • Yanlong Cao
  • Ting Liu
  • Jiangxin Yang
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Abstract

During the design and manufacturing process, the dimensional and geometric tolerances assigned to parts will affect the required functionality through a stack-up of deviations. Choosing an appropriate tolerance analysis model is important to calculate the influence that every tolerance has on key characteristics, and these models are fundamental tools for shortening the product development cycle with improved quality at a lower cost. There are many tolerance analysis models proposed in the literature. This paper, relying on the sizable literature, briefly presents eight of the most widely used models for tolerance analysis. Through a study of the research status of the analysis methods and applications, a comparison is proposed to show each method’s advantages and disadvantages, similarities, and differences. Such a comparison furnishes criteria which are helpful in choosing the most appropriate model under various circumstances, as well as improving the accuracy of analysis.

Keywords

Tolerance analysis Tolerance models Key characteristics Research status Comparison 

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Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51575484 and U1501248) and Science Fund for Creative Research Groups of National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51521064).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Ltd., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Fluid Power and Mechatronic Systems, College of Mechanical EngineeringZhejiang UniversityHangzhouChina
  2. 2.Key Laboratory of Advanced Manufacturing Technology of Zhejiang Province, College of Mechanical EngineeringZhejiang UniversityHangzhouChina

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