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MCID and PASS in Knee Surgeries. Theoretical Aspects and Clinical Relevance References

Abstract

The application and interpretation of patient-reported outcome measures (PROM), following knee injuries, pathologies, and interventions, can be challenging. In recent years, the literature has been enriched with metrics to facilitate our understanding and interpretation of these outcome measures. Two commonly utilized tools include the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) and the patient acceptable symptoms state (PASS). These measures have demonstrated clinical value, however, they have often been under- or mis-reported. It is paramount to use them to understand the clinical significance of any statistically significant results. Still, it remains important to know their caveats and limitations. In this focused report on MCID and PASS, their definitions, methods of calculations, clinical relevance, interpretations, and limitations are reviewed and presented in a simple approach.

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Mabrouk, A., Nwachukwu, B., Pareek, A. et al. MCID and PASS in Knee Surgeries. Theoretical Aspects and Clinical Relevance References. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc (2023). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00167-023-07359-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00167-023-07359-2

Keywords

  • Minimal clinically important difference (MCID)
  • Patient acceptable symptom state (PASS)
  • Patient reported outcome measures (PROM)