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Effect of early active range of motion rehabilitation on outcome measures after partial meniscectomy

  • Brent M. KellnEmail author
  • Christopher D. Ingersoll
  • Susan Saliba
  • Mark D. Miller
  • Jay Hertel
Knee

Abstract

Range of motion (ROM) exercises are accepted as being an essential part of post-operative knee rehabilitation but there is little research to support this treatment. Our purpose was to determine whether a specific early, active ROM intervention using a bicycle ergometer equipped with an adjustable pedal arm offered measurable benefit to post-operative partial meniscectomy patients. Thirty-one subjects were randomly assigned to experimental or control groups. The experimental group rode a stationary bicycle equipped with the pedal arm device six times over 2 weeks post-operatively under the supervision of a physical therapist while the control group did not. Subjective measures of gait were significantly different with a positive experimental group response to the supervised exercise with improved gait performance at weeks 1, 2 and 4 after surgery (≤ 0.05). Early, protected active ROM exercise on a bicycle ergometer equipped with an adjustable pedal arm demonstrated promising results in patients after partial meniscectomy.

Keywords

Arthroscopy Cycle ergometer Gait Knee Quadriceps control 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brent M. Kelln
    • 1
    • 5
    Email author
  • Christopher D. Ingersoll
    • 2
  • Susan Saliba
    • 3
  • Mark D. Miller
    • 4
  • Jay Hertel
    • 3
  1. 1.Clinical Support ServicesNaval Health Clinic HawaiiPearl HarborUSA
  2. 2.Department of Sports MedicineUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA
  3. 3.Department of KinesiologyUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA
  4. 4.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA
  5. 5.HonoluluUSA

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