Journal of Population Economics

, Volume 29, Issue 4, pp 1083–1111

Unconditional government social cash transfer in Africa does not increase fertility

  • Tia Palermo
  • Sudhanshu Handa
  • Amber Peterman
  • Leah Prencipe
  • David Seidenfeld
  • on behalf of the Zambia CGP Evaluation Team
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00148-016-0596-x

Cite this article as:
Palermo, T., Handa, S., Peterman, A. et al. J Popul Econ (2016) 29: 1083. doi:10.1007/s00148-016-0596-x

Abstract

Among policymakers, a common perception surrounding the effects of cash transfer programmes, particularly unconditional programmes targeted to families with children, is that they induce increased fertility. We evaluate the Zambian Child Grant Programme, a government unconditional cash transfer targeted to families with a child under the age of 5 and examine impacts on fertility and household composition. The evaluation was a cluster randomized control trial, with data collected over 4 years from 2010 to 2014. Our results indicate that there are no programme impacts on overall fertility. Our results contribute to a small evidence base demonstrating that there are no unintended incentives related to fertility due to cash transfers.

Keywords

Fertility Unconditional cash transfers Zambia Africa 

JEL Classifications

J1 I1 I3 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tia Palermo
    • 1
  • Sudhanshu Handa
    • 1
    • 2
  • Amber Peterman
    • 1
  • Leah Prencipe
    • 1
  • David Seidenfeld
    • 3
  • on behalf of the Zambia CGP Evaluation Team
  1. 1.UNICEF Office of Research—InnocentiFlorenceItaly
  2. 2.Department of Public PolicyUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  3. 3.American Institutes for Research (AIR)WashingtonUSA

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