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Unemployment and earnings for second generation immigrants in Sweden. Ethnic background and parent composition

Abstract.

This study sheds light on the labour market outcomes of children born to immigrants in the destination country, i.e. second generation immigrants. The study has the advantage of being able to (i) identify several different ethnic backgrounds and (ii) identify the parent composition, i.e. whether one or both parents of the individual are foreign born. The labour market outcomes of second generation immigrants mirror those of first generation immigrants in that we find heterogeneity in labour market outcomes to be associated with ethnic background. Moreover, these outcomes, especially for Southern and non-European backgrounds, are much worse than those for native-born with a Swedish background. Finally, the outcome is more favourable if one parent is born in Sweden compared to having both parents foreign born, especially if the mother is native born.

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Correspondence to Dan-Olof Rooth.

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All Correspondence to Dan-Olof Rooth. We are grateful for several helpful comments and suggestions from two anonymous referees. A research grant from the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research is gratefully acknowledged. Responsible editor: Christoph M. Schmidt.

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Rooth, DO., Ekberg, J. Unemployment and earnings for second generation immigrants in Sweden. Ethnic background and parent composition. J Popul Econ 16, 787–814 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-003-0163-0

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00148-003-0163-0

JEL classification:

  • J15
  • J24
  • J61
  • J71

Key words:

  • Second generation immigrants
  • discrimination
  • human capital formation