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Potentiality, intentionality, and embodiment: a genetic phenomenological sociology of Apple’s technology

Abstract

Scholars refute the dichotomy of subject and object in the study of technology. Basing on relational ontology and revised empirical study, namely the social historical phenomenology of technology, inspired by post-phenomenology and actor-network theory, this study adopts an approach informed by the genetic phenomenological sociology (Zhang 2017; 2020) of technology, and examines the formation of Apple’s technology in the process of its emergence and diffusion. Unlike post-phenomenology and actor-network theory, which mainly examine the role of technology in the relation of human-technology-world after technology was formed, this study examines technology in the process of its formation. The relationship between the intentionality of humanity and the potentiality of technology is explored empirically and ontologically, thus transcending the dichotomy of subject and object in the examination of technology through the relational ontology indicated in potentiality, intentionality, embodiment, and genealogy, and simultaneously building a foundation for the critique, ethics, and normative theory of media and technology.

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Correspondence to Vincent Qing Zhang.

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Zhang, V.Q. Potentiality, intentionality, and embodiment: a genetic phenomenological sociology of Apple’s technology. AI & Soc (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00146-021-01275-0

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Keywords

  • Potentiality
  • Intentionality
  • Embodiment
  • Genealogy
  • Apple’s technology
  • Genetic phenomenological sociology