Self-experimentation and web trials

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Further Reading

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  4. Goldman, L.S.; Genel, M.; Bezman, R.J.; et al. for the Council on Scientific Affairs, American Medical Association. (1998). “Diagnosis and Treatment of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents.” Journal of the American Medical Association, 279:1100–1107.

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  5. Hulley, S.; Grady, D.; Bush, T.; et al. (1998). “Randomized Trial of Estrogen Plus Progestin for Secondary Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease in Postmenopausal Women.” Journal of the American Medical Association, 280:605–613.

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  6. Manson, J.E.; Hsia, J.; Johnson, K.C.; et al. (2003). “Estrogen Plus Progestin and the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease.” The New England Journal of Medicine, 349:523–534.

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  7. Proschan, M.A. (1996). “On the Distribution of the Unpaired T-Statistic with Paired Data.” Statistics in Medicine, 15:1059–1063.

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Proschan, M. Self-experimentation and web trials. CHANCE 21, 7–9 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00144-008-0001-y

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