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Individual Rather Than Simultaneous Priming with Glutathione and Putrescine Reduces Chromium Cr6+ Toxicity in Contrasting Canola (Brassica napus L.) Cultivars

Abstract

The chromium (Cr6+) toxicity mechanisms have not been fully revealed yet in plants mainly due to its complex electronic chemistry. Both putrescine (PUT) and glutathione (GSH) are reported to be involved in plethora of plant cellular processes. Therefore, we hypothesized that exogenous individual or co-application of PUT and GSH could alleviate the Cr6+ stress in genetically diverse canola cultivars. The seed priming with GSH (0.1 mM) alleviated inhibitory effects of Cr6+ on root growth, and thus plants raised from GSH-treated seed had higher leaf chlorophyll a contents (78, 69 and 82%, in Shiralee, Rainbow and Dunkled cultivar, respectively), carotenoids contents, stem phenolics, root GSH, leaf and root NO concentration. The foliar treatment with PUT caused 37 and 11.9% decrease in the accumulation of Cr in shoot of Shiralee and Dunkled, respectively. Overall, the results suggested that seed priming with GSH regulated leaf photosynthetic pigments to cope with Cr6+ shock at early growth stage whereas foliar treatment with PUT decreased Cr transport to the shoot, and thus increased tolerance at later growth stage irrespective of cultivars.

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Correspondence to Muhammad Iqbal.

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Jahan, A., Iqbal, M. & Malik, A. Individual Rather Than Simultaneous Priming with Glutathione and Putrescine Reduces Chromium Cr6+ Toxicity in Contrasting Canola (Brassica napus L.) Cultivars. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 107, 427–432 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-021-03219-2

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Keywords

  • Glutathione
  • Putrescine
  • Chromium toxicity
  • Photosynthetic pigments
  • Secondary metabolites
  • Canola