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Assessment of Heavy Metal Contamination in Excreta of Baya Weaver Bird (Ploceus Philippinus) from Three Districts of Different Zones of Punjab

Abstract

The objective of the study was to assess the heavy metal contamination in excreta of the Baya Weaver Bird (Ploceus philippinus). Samples were collected from nesting colony sites present in three districts viz. Ludhiana (location I), Ropar (location II) and Ferozepur (location III) falling in Central plain zone, Undulating plain zone and Western plain zone of Punjab respectively. In dry excreta samples fifteen elements were detected through ICAP-AES; As, Pb, Cd, Cr were toxic heavy metals and B, Fe, Cu, Ni, Zn, Mn, Mg, Ca, P, S, Na were essential elements. Toxic heavy metals viz. As (1.88–2.10 ppm), Pb (2.70- 5.25 ppm) and Cr (13.30–23.78 ppm) were found above normal range in excreta collected from studied locations. Statistical analysis showed significant difference among heavy metals and locations which signifies the bioaccumulation of different metals at different locations in excreta of Baya Weaver Bird due to different type of contaminations at studied locations.

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Acknowledgement

The authors are extremely grateful to the Head, Department of Zoology and Head, Department of Soil Sciences, Punjab Agricultural University for providing necessary facilities to carry out this work.

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Correspondence to Sukhpreet Kaur Sidhu.

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Sidhu, S.K., Kler, T.K. Assessment of Heavy Metal Contamination in Excreta of Baya Weaver Bird (Ploceus Philippinus) from Three Districts of Different Zones of Punjab. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 106, 799–804 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-021-03181-z

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Keywords

  • Baya Weaver Bird
  • Bird excreta
  • Environmental contamination
  • Heavy metal