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Enzymatic, Non-enzymatatic Antioxidant Levels and Heat Shock Protein Expression as Indicators of Metal Induced Toxicity and Reproductive Modulation in Female Indian Major Carp Cirrhinus cirrhosus

Abstract

Effects of zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) exposure on oxidative biomarkers and heat shock protein (HSP) expression, and their possible relation to ovarian steroidogenesis in fish were investigated. Female Cirrhinus cirrhosus were exposed to 1/10th of LC50 of metals for 30 days, and kept for another 30 days without metal exposure. Metal concentrations, antioxidants, HSPs, 17β-estradiol and steroidogenic enzymes were analysed in brain and ovary after 15 and 30 days of exposure and a 15 and 30 day recovery period. Activities of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants showed duration dependent variation in both exposure and recovery period. HSP70 and HSP90 expressions increased following metal exposure, with the expression being higher in brain than ovary. 17β-Estradiol, steroidogenic enzymes decreased significantly (p < 0.05) after metal exposure. The present study suggests that metals have differential and tissue specific influence on oxidative status and manipulate ovarian steroidogenesis probably through the modulation of HSPs.

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Acknowledgements

MM thankfully acknowledge DST-NPDF Programme (PDF/2017/001308), DST, Govt. of India for financial support.

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Correspondence to Suman Bhusan Chakraborty.

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Moniruzzaman, M., Das, D., Dhara, A. et al. Enzymatic, Non-enzymatatic Antioxidant Levels and Heat Shock Protein Expression as Indicators of Metal Induced Toxicity and Reproductive Modulation in Female Indian Major Carp Cirrhinus cirrhosus. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 104, 235–244 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-019-02766-z

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Keywords

  • Heat shock protein
  • Antioxidant
  • Steroidogenesis
  • Zinc
  • Lead