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Degradation of Bisphenol A in Natural and Artificial Marine and Freshwaters in Turkey

Abstract

Bisphenol A (BPA), one of the important synthetic chemicals, has been produced at high volumes since the 1960s. These chemicals are commonly detected in the marine and freshwater environments; however, their transformation in aquatic environments depends on many parameters. This study aims to investigate the degradation of BPA in marine and freshwaters under different conditions in terms of microbial degradation, photodegradation, and temperature effect. The results showed that BPA content in samples prepared from the artificial waters did not change significantly in 150 days. BPA concentrations in natural river water started to degrade after day 50, and the degradation rate was faster for the samples at 25°C than ones at 4°C. In natural seawater samples, there was no degradation detected in 150 days at 4°C and 25°C. However, samples prepared in natural seawater, kept outside, and exposed to over 40°C temperature showed degradation after day 50. A treatment exposed to the sunlight showed a higher degradation rate, indicating the additive/synergistic role of the photodegradation. Our study suggests that high temperatures ( > 25°C) are required for BPA degradation in seawater. River water is more potent than seawater for BPA degradation. It is suggested that BPA contamination in a marine environment could be more persistent than in a freshwater environment.

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Acknowledgements

This work is partially funded by Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK) under Grant Number TUBITAK 115YE627; ‘Impacts of Microplastic Particles and Bisphenol A as a Chemical Additive on Zooplankton Species in the Mersin Bay’. This study was also supported in part by DEKOSIM (BAP-08–11-DPT2012K120880) Project funded by the Turkish Ministry of Development.

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Correspondence to Emel Kocaman or Koray Ozhan.

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Kocaman, E., Ozhan, K. Degradation of Bisphenol A in Natural and Artificial Marine and Freshwaters in Turkey. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 103, 496–500 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-019-02680-4

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Keywords

  • Bisphenol A
  • Degradation
  • The mediterranean sea
  • Half-life