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Response of Taste and Odor Compounds to Elevated Cyanobacteria Biomass and Temperature

Abstract

Taste and odor (T&O) compounds are frequently reported during black blooms, however, their production mechanisms and influencing factors are far from clear. In this study, laboratory simulation experiment was carried out to investigate the formation processes of T&O compounds under the influences of temperature, cyanobacteria biomass and their combined effects. The decay of cyanobacteria blooms caused increased T&O compounds loading to water. Results showed the maximum dimethyl sulfide (DMS) release concentration was observed at 35°C compared with that at 25 and 30°C. DMS release concentration under cyanobacteria biomass of 25000 g/m3 demonstrated the highest production, whereas the minimum DMS production were obtained under 7500 g/m3. Similar patterns were observed for dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, β-cyclocitral and β-ionone production. Therefore, higher temperature and higher cyanobacteria biomass can enhance the concentration of T&O compounds. Furthermore, there were synergistic effects of cyanobacteria biomass and temperature on the production of T&O compounds.

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Acknowledgements

This research was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41573061), Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu (No. BK20150978), Research Projects of Water Environment Comprehensive Management in Taihu Lake of Jiangsu Province (No. TH2014402) and the Natural Science Foundation of the Higher Education Institutions of Jiangsu Province, China (No. 15KJB610007).

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Correspondence to Xiaoguang Xu or Guoxiang Wang.

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Huang, H., Xu, X., Shi, C. et al. Response of Taste and Odor Compounds to Elevated Cyanobacteria Biomass and Temperature. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 101, 272–278 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-018-2386-5

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Keywords

  • Taste and odor compounds
  • Cyanobacteria biomass
  • Temperature