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Potential Toxic Metal Accumulation in Soil, Forage and Blood Plasma of Buffaloes Sampled from Jhang, Pakistan

Abstract

This study was conducted to determine the concentration of toxic metals in soil, forage and blood plasma of lactating and non-lactating buffaloes in the district Jhang, Punjab, Pakistan. Soil samples were collected from varying distances from the road side. Plasma separation was achieved by centrifugation. The concentration of arsenic (As), selenium (Se), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and cobalt (Co) were determined by using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The results of the study showed that the mean As, Se and Cd concentrations in soil samples were lower while Cr, Fe, Zn, Cu and Co were higher than the official guidelines. In plasma samples, mean concentration values of Co, Zn, Fe, Cd, Se and As were lower while Cu and Cr were higher than the recommended concentrations. According to the results of the study there was no potential exposure of toxicity in buffaloes of the study area.

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Acknowledgements

Laboratory facilities are provided by High Tech Lab University of Sargodha. The authors also thank all the supporters for suggestions and comments for the improvement of this manuscript.

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Correspondence to Ilker Ugulu.

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Khan, Z.I., Ugulu, I., Umar, S. et al. Potential Toxic Metal Accumulation in Soil, Forage and Blood Plasma of Buffaloes Sampled from Jhang, Pakistan. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 101, 235–242 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-018-2353-1

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Keywords

  • Soil
  • Forage
  • Blood plasma
  • Metals
  • Buffalo