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Impact of Saw Dust Application on the Distribution of Potentially Toxic Metals in Contaminated Soil

Abstract

The need to develop an approach for the reclamation of contaminated site using locally available agricultural waste has been considered. The present study investigated the application of sawdust as an effective amendment in the immobilization of potentially toxic metals (PTMs) by conducting a greenhouse experiment on soil collected from an automobile dumpsite. The amended and non-amended soil samples were analyzed for their physicochemical parameters and sequential extraction of PTMs. The results revealed that application of amendment had positive impact on the physicochemical parameters as organic matter content and cation exchange capacity increased from 12.1% to 12.8% and 16.4 to 16.8 meq/100 g respectively. However, the mobility and bioavalability of these metals was reduced as they were found to be distributed mostly in the non-exchangeable phase of soil. Therefore, application of sawdust successfully immobilized PTMs and could be applied for future studies in agricultural soil reclamation.

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Acknowledgements

I am grateful for the technical support received from Central Science Laboratory, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

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Correspondence to Emmmanuel E. Awokunmi.

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Awokunmi, E.E. Impact of Saw Dust Application on the Distribution of Potentially Toxic Metals in Contaminated Soil. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 99, 765–770 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-017-2192-5

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Keywords

  • Reclamation
  • Agricultural soil
  • Field application
  • Saw dust