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Genotypic Differences in Growth and Antioxidant Enzyme Activities Under Cadmium Stress in Sugarcane

Abstract

To evaluate the genotypic differences of sugarcane in response to cadmium (Cd) stress, the growth, Cd content, antioxidant enzymes, malondialdehyde (MDA) and proline in the leaves of five sugarcane varieties were investigated under normal and Cd-contaminated soil at 90 days after treatment (DAT). Height, diameter, and biomass significantly decreased in all varieties under Cd stress, with the greatest reduction in HOCP07-613 and less effects on YT666 and YT94-128. The Cd content in sugarcane markedly increased under Cd stress. Cd stress induced a significant increase in MDA contents in HOCP07-613 and ROC22 at 90 DAT and a greater increase in proline content in YT94-128 and YT666. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) were affected by Cd stress in four varieties (excluding YT666). The increase in SOD and APX activities in the early stage of Cd stress (30 DAT) might help alleviate oxidative stress in sugarcane. These results suggested that the different responses of antioxidant systems to Cd stress might affect Cd tolerance of sugarcane.

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Acknowledgements

The sugarcane was kindly provided by the Hainan Sugarcane Breeding Station and the Zhanjiang Sugarcane Breeding Station.

Funding

This study was funded by the Science and Technology Planting Project of Guangdong Province, China (2015A030302031, 2014B070705002, 2014A040401033, and 2015A030302030) and the China Agricultural Research System (CARS-20-1-4).

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Correspondence to Qiaoying Zeng or Qiwei Li.

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The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Zeng, Q., Ling, Q., Hu, F. et al. Genotypic Differences in Growth and Antioxidant Enzyme Activities Under Cadmium Stress in Sugarcane. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 99, 607–613 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-017-2185-4

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Keywords

  • Sugarcane
  • Cadmium stress
  • Growth
  • Antioxidant enzyme