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Effects of Cadmium Exposure on Metal Accumulation and Energy Metabolism of Silver Carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix)

Abstract

Effects of cadmium (Cd) exposure on metal accumulation and energy metabolism of silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) were studied during 14 days. The results showed that Cd accumulated in tissues of silver carp significantly with time and Cd concentration, as the order: liver > kidney > gill > muscle. The levels of muscle glycogen, triglyceride, and plasma triglyceride decreased significantly (p < 0.05). The levels of muscle protein, plasma glucose and lactate significantly increased during the first 8 days, and then all significantly decreased (p < 0.05). No significant alternations were observed in muscle cortisol, ATP and plasma protein (p > 0.05). The results indicate that the tissues’ Cd concentrations and energy metabolism were altered by the presence of waterborne Cd, and silver carp mobilizes the muscle energy stores to cope with the increased energy demands for detoxication and repair mechanism induced by the exposure to waterborne Cd.

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Acknowledgements

This study was supported by the Special Fund for Agro-Scientific Research in the Public Interest of China (No. 201503108), Educational Commission of Hunan Province, China (No. 17A099), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 31772832).

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Correspondence to Deliang Li or Ting Zhang.

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Li, D., Pi, J., Wang, J. et al. Effects of Cadmium Exposure on Metal Accumulation and Energy Metabolism of Silver Carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix). Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 99, 567–573 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-017-2180-9

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Keywords

  • Cadmium accumulation
  • Hypophthalmichthys molitrix
  • Energy metabolism
  • Waterborne exposure