Mercury Concentrations in the Fish Community from Indrawati River, Nepal

  • Aastha Pandey
  • Chhatra Mani Sharma
  • Shichang Kang
  • Qianggong Zhang
  • Lekhendra Tripathee
  • Junming Guo
  • Xiaofei Li
  • Shiwei Sun
  • Rukumesh Paudyal
  • Prakash Acharya
  • Mika Sillanpää
Article

Abstract

This study quantified concentrations of mercury (Hg) and its trophic transfer along the fish community in the Indrawati River, Nepal. Stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon (δ13C), complemented by stomach contents data were used to assess the food web structure and trophic transfer of Hg in 54 fishes; 43 Shizothorax richardsonii and 11 Barilius spp. [B. bendelisis (1), B. vagra (3) and B. barila (7)]. Sixty-one muscle samples (including six replicates) were used for the analysis of total mercury (THg) and stable isotopes. Mean THg concentrations in B. spp. and the more common species S. richardsonii was observed to be 218.23 (ng/g, ww) and 90.82 (ng/g, ww), respectively. THg versus total length in both S. richardsonii and B. spp. showed a decreasing tendency with an increase in age. Regression of logTHg versus δ15N among the fish species showed a significant positive correlation only in S. richardsonii indicating biomagnification along the trophic level in this species.

Keywords

Bioaccumulation Biomagnification Himalayan River 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aastha Pandey
    • 1
  • Chhatra Mani Sharma
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Shichang Kang
    • 4
    • 5
  • Qianggong Zhang
    • 5
    • 6
  • Lekhendra Tripathee
    • 3
    • 4
  • Junming Guo
    • 4
  • Xiaofei Li
    • 4
  • Shiwei Sun
    • 4
  • Rukumesh Paudyal
    • 3
    • 4
  • Prakash Acharya
    • 7
  • Mika Sillanpää
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of ScienceKathmandu UniversityKathmanduNepal
  2. 2.Laboratory of Green ChemistryLappeenranta University of TechnologyMikkeliFinland
  3. 3.Himalayan Environment Research Institute (HERI)KathmanduNepal
  4. 4.State Key Laboratory of Cryospheric Sciences, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and ResourcesChinese Academy of SciencesLanzhouChina
  5. 5.CAS Center for Excellence in Tibetan Plateau Earth SciencesChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  6. 6.Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau ResearchChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  7. 7.Faculty of Applied Ecology and Agricultural SciencesHedmark University of Applied SciencesElverumNorway

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