Skip to main content

Enhanced Phytoextraction of Lead from Artificially Contaminated Soil by Mirabilis jalapa with Chelating Agents

Abstract

A microcosm experiment was conducted to compare how different chelating agents enhance the phytoextraction of lead (Pb) by Mirabilis jalapa from an artificially Pb-contaminated soil. Chelating agents used included ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), ethylene diamine disuccinic acid (EDDS), oxalic acid, humic acid, citric acid and tartaric acid, with concentrations ranging from 0 to 2000 mg/kg. Results show that with increasing concentrations of chelating agents, the concentrations, bioaccumulation coefficients, and translocation factors of Pb in M. jalapa gradually increased. Of all chelating agents used, the concentrations, bioaccumulation coefficients and translocation factors of Pb in M. jalapa were higher for EDTA and NTA than for the other chelating agents. Given the potential environmental risks of EDTA, we recommend NTA be used as a suitable chelating agent to increase the phytoremediation of Pb-contaminated soil with M. jalapa.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

References

  1. Bennett LE, Burkhead JL, Hale KL, Terry N, Pilon M, PilonSmits EAH (2003) Analysis of transgenic Indian mustard plants for phytoremediation of metal-contaminated mine tailings. J Environ Qual 32:432–440

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  2. Blais J-F, Meunier N, Mercier G. (2010) New technologies for toxic metals removal from contaminated sites. Recent Pat Eng 4:1–6

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  3. Cheng S (2003) Heavy metal pollution in China: origin, pattern and control. Environ Sci Pollut Res 10:192–198

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  4. Datko-Williams L, Wilkie A, Richmond-Bryant J (2014) Analysis of U.S. soil lead (Pb) studies from 1970 to 2012. Sci Total Environ 468–469:854–863

    Article  Google Scholar 

  5. Dickinson NM, Pulford ID (2005) Cadmium phytoextraction using short-rotation coppice Salix: the evidence trail. Environ Int 31:609–613

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  6. Evangelou MWH, Ebel M, Schaeffer A (2007) Chelate assisted phytoextraction of heavy metals from soil. Effect, mechanism, toxicity, and fate of chelating agents. Chemosphere 68:989–1003

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  7. Farwell AJ, Vesely S, Nero V, Rodriguez H, McCormack K, Shah S, Dixon DG, Glick BR (2007) Tolerance of transgenic canola plants (Brassica napus) amended with plant growth promoting bacteria to flooding stress at a metal contaminated field site. Environ Poll 147:540–545

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  8. Kärenlampi S, Schat H, Vangronsveld J, Verkleij JAC, van der Lelie D, Mergeay M, Tervahauta AI (2000) Genetic engineering in the improvement of plants for phytoremediation of metal polluted soils. Environ Pollut 107:225–231

    Article  Google Scholar 

  9. Klimek B, Tarasek A, Hajduk J (2015) Trace element concentrations in lichens collected in the Beskidy Mountains, the outer western Carpathians. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 94:532–536

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  10. Leštan D, Luo C, Li X (2008) The use of chelating agents in the remediation of metal-contaminated soils: a review. Environ Pollut 153:3–13

    Article  Google Scholar 

  11. Li C, Shao Z, Wang Y, Zhang J (2010) Enrichment characteristics of Pb by several kinds of ornamental plants. J Soil Water Conserv 24:127–130/134 (in Chinese)

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  12. Liphadzi MS, Kirkham MB (2006) Availability and plant uptake of heavy metals in EDTA-assisted phytoremediation of soil and composted biosolids. S Afr J Bot 72:391–397

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  13. Liphadzi MS, Kirkham MB, Mankin KR, Paulsen GM (2003) EDTA-assisted heavy-metal uptake by poplar and sunflower grown at a long-term sewage-sludge farm. Plant Soil 257:171–182

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  14. Luo C, Shen Z, Li X (2005) Enhanced phytoextraction of Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd with EDTA and EDDS. Chemosphere 59:1–11

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  15. Meers E, Ruttens A, Hopgood MJ, Samson D, Tack FMG (2005) Comparison of EDTA and EDDS as potential soil amendments for enhanced phytoextraction of heavy metals. Chemosphere 58:1011–1022

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  16. Peng S, Zhou Q, Cai Z, Zhang Z (2009) Phytoremediation of petroleum contaminated soils by Mirabilis jalapa L. in a greenhouse plot experiment. J Hazard Mater 168:1490–1496

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  17. Pereira BFF, De-Abreu CA, Herpin U, De-Abreu MF, Berton RS (2010) Phytoremediation of lead by jack beans on a rhodic hapludox amended with EDTA. Sci Agric 67:308–318

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  18. Repo E, Warchol JK, Westholm LJ, Sillanpaeae M (2015) Steel slag as a low-cost sorbent for metal removal in the presence of chelating agents. J Ind Eng Chem 27:115–125

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  19. Soil Survey Staff (2003) Keys to soil taxonomy, 9th edn. United States Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources Conservation Service, Washington, D.C

    Google Scholar 

  20. Tanhan P, Kruatrachue M, Pokethitiyook P, Chaiyarat R (2007) Uptake and accumulation of cadmium, lead and zinc by Siam weed [Chromolaena odorata (L.) King & Robinson]. Chemosphere 68:323–329

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  21. Wei B, Yang L (2010) A review of heavy metal contaminations in urban soils, urban road dusts and agricultural soils from China. Microchem J 94:99–107

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  22. Wong CSC, Li X, Thornton I (2006) Urban environmental geochemistry of trace metals. Environ Pollut 142:1–16

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  23. Yu Z, Zhou Q (2009) Growth responses and cadmium accumulation of Mirabilis jalapa L. under interaction between cadmium and phosphorus. J Hazard Mater 167:38–43

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Acknowledgements

The National Natural Science Foundation of China (41471196) and National Training Programs of Innovation and Entrepreneurship for Undergraduates (201610193013) provided support for this study.

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Jinjing Zhang, Qiang Gao or Wenjing Zhang.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Yan, L., Li, C., Zhang, J. et al. Enhanced Phytoextraction of Lead from Artificially Contaminated Soil by Mirabilis jalapa with Chelating Agents. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 99, 208–212 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-017-2127-1

Download citation

Keywords

  • Phytoremediation
  • Metal
  • Bioaccumulation coefficient
  • Translocation factor
  • EDTA
  • NTA