Skip to main content

Effects of Organic Acids and Sylvite on Phytoextraction of 241Am Contaminated Soil

Abstract

Contamination of soil with Americium (241Am) at nuclear sites in China poses a serious problem. We screened six plants, from five families, for their 241Am-enrichment potential. Europium (Eu), which is morphologically and chemically similar to the highly toxic 241Am, was used in its place. Moreover, the effects of sylvite, citric acid (CA), malic acid (MA), and humic acid (HA) on the absorption of 241Am by the plants, and its transport within them, were evaluated along with their effect on plant biomass and 241Am extraction volume. Barley and cabbage showed relatively stronger Eu accumulation capacities. Citric acid promoted the absorption of 241Am by barley roots and its transport within the plants. The effects of sylvite were not obvious and those of HA were the weakest in case of sunflower; HA, however, maximally increased the biomass of the plants. Our results could provide the basis for future radionuclide phytoremediation of contaminated soils.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Fig. 1
Fig. 2
Fig. 3

References

  1. Bolsunovsky A, Zotina T, Bondareva L (2005) Accumulation and release of 241Am by a macrophyte of the Yenisei river (Elodea canadensis). J Environ Radioactivity 81:33–46

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  2. Chang PC, Kim KW, Yoshida S, Kim SY (2005) Uranium accumulation of crop plants enhanced by citric acid. Environ Geochem Health 27:529–538

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  3. Chao JH, Lee HP, Chiu CY (2006) Measurement of 224Ra uptake in a fern actively accumulating radium. Chemosphere 62:1656–1664

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  4. Cheng H (2005) Environmental soil science. Science Press, Beijing, pp 322–341

    Google Scholar 

  5. Dodge CJ, Francis AJ (1994) Photodegradation of uranium-citrate complex with uranium recovery. Environ Sci Technol 28:1300–1306

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  6. Dushenkov S (2003) Trends in phytoremediation of radionuclides. Plant Soil 249:167–175

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  7. Ebbs SD, Brady DJ, Kochian LV (1998) Role of uranium speciation in the uptake and translocation of uranium by plants. J Exp Bot 49:1183–1190

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  8. Favas PJC, Pratas J, Varun M, D’Souza R, Paul MJ (2014) Accumulation of uranium by aquatic plants in field conditions: prospects for phytoremediation. Sci Total Environ 470–471:993–1002

    Article  Google Scholar 

  9. Fuhrmann M, Lanzirotti A (2005) 241Am, 137Cs, Sr and Pb uptake by tobacco as influenced by application of Fe chelators to soil. J Environ Radioact 82:33–50

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  10. Hansen AM, Leckie JO, Mandelli EF, Altmann S (1990) Study of copper (II) association with dissolved organic matter in surface waters of three Mexican coastal lagoons. Environ Sci Tech 24:683–688

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  11. Huang JW, Blaylock MJ, Kapulnik Y, Ensley BD (1998a) Phyoremediation of uranium-contaminated soils: role of organic acids in triggering uranium hyperaccumulation in plants. Environ Sci Technol 32:2004–2008

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  12. Huang FC, Brady PV, Lindgren ER, Guerra P (1998b) Biodegradation of uranium-citrate complexes: implications for extraction of uranium from soils. Environ Sci Technol 32:379–382

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  13. Islam KR, Weil RR (1998) A rapid microwave digestion method for colorimetric measurement of soil organic carbon. Commun Soil Sci Plant Anal 29:2269–2284

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  14. Jagetiya B, Sharma A (2013) Optimization of chelators to enhance uranium uptake from tailings for phytoremediation. Chemosphere 91:692–696

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  15. Livens FR, Horrill AD, Singleton DL (1994) The relationship between concentrations of plutonium and americium in soil interstitial waters and their uptake by plants. Sci Total Environ 155:151–159

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  16. McGrath SP, Zhao FJ, Lombi E (2001) Plant and rhizosphere process involved in phytoremediation of metal-contaminated soils. Plant Soil 232:207–214

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  17. Pratas J, Rodrigues N, Paulo C (2006) Uranium accumulator plants from the centre of Portugal—their potential to phytoremediation. In: Merkel BJ (ed) Uranium in the environment: mining impact and consequences. Springer, Berlin, pp 477–482

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  18. Qi F, Zha Z, Du L (2014) Impact of mixed low-molecular-weight organic acids on uranium accumulation and distribution in a variant of mustard (Brassica juncea var. Tumida). J Radioanal Nucl Chem 302:149–159

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  19. Ramaswami A, Carr P, Burkhardt M (2001) Plant-uptake of uranium: hydroponic and soil system studies. Int J Phytoremediation 3:189–201

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  20. Rowland AP, Haygarth PM (1997) Determination of total dissolved phosphorus in soil solutions. J Environ Qual 26:410–415

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  21. Salt DE, Smith RD, Raskin I (1998) Use of Brassica plants in the phytoremediation and biofumigation processes. Phytoremediat Annu Rev Plant Physiol Plant Mol Biol 49:643–668

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  22. Xiaoquan San (2004) Research to phytoremediation and hyperaccumulators. J Anal Sci 20(4):431–432

    Google Scholar 

  23. Schulz RK, Tompkins GA, Leventhal L, Babcock KL (1976) Uptake of plutonium and americium by barley from two contaminated nevada test site soils. J Environ Qual 5:406–410

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  24. Shahandeh H, Hossner LR (2002) Role of soil properties in phytoaccumulation of uranium. Water Air Soil Pollut 141:165–180

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  25. Singh S, Eapen S, Thorat V, Kaushik CP, Kanwar R, D’Souza SF (2008) Phytoremediation of 137cesium and 90strontium from solutions and low-level nuclear waste by Vetiveria zizanoides. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf 69:06–311

    Google Scholar 

  26. Tang SR, Zheng JM, Chen ZY (2004) Uptake and accumulation of 134Cs by six plant varieties from the amaranthaceae grown in nutrient solution. Acta Agric Nucl Sin 18:474–479

    Google Scholar 

  27. Tang L, Bo Y, Deng D (2009) The selection of hyperaccumulators for phytoremediation of uranium-contaminated soils and their uranium-accumulating characters. Nucl Tech 32:136–141

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  28. Vandenhove H, Van Hees M (2004) Phytoextraction for clean-up of low-level uranium contaminated soil evaluated. J Environ Radioact 72:41–45

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  29. Vandenhove H, Cuypers A, Van Hees M, Koppen G, Wannijn J (2006) Oxidative stress reactions induced in beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) following exposure to uranium. Plant Physiol Biochem 44:795–805

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  30. Wang YD, Li GY, Ding DX, Tan Y (2013) Uranium leaching using mixed organic acids produced by Aspergillus niger. J Radioanal Nucl Chem 298:769–773

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  31. Xu J, Gong Y, Zhang Q (2009) Comparison of uranium from soil and tolerance by three herb species. Chem Res Appl 21:322–326

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  32. Yan F, Schubert S, Mengel K (1996) Soil pH increase due to biological decarboxylation of organic anions. Soil Biol Biochem 28:617–624

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  33. Zha Z, Wang D, Feng X, Liu L (2014) Evaluation on remediation of uranium contaminated soil by brassica mustard. Chem Res Appl 26(2):223–229

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  34. Zheng X, Zhu K (2009) The application of chelating agents in the phytoremediation of heavy metal contaminated soil. Environ Sci Manage 34:106–109

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the associate researcher, Manfei Pu (Nuclear Physics and Chemistry Institute of Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics), and research assistant, Bo Wu, for their help and support in plant cultivation and sample preparation. The funding was provided by the National Natural Science Foundations of China (21577133).

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Ping Wang.

Ethics declarations

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Wang, P., Du, L., Tan, Z. et al. Effects of Organic Acids and Sylvite on Phytoextraction of 241Am Contaminated Soil. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 98, 407–412 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-016-2004-3

Download citation

Keywords

  • 241Am
  • Phytoextraction
  • Hyperaccumulation factor
  • Transport Factor
  • Extraction efficiency