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Elemental Composition of Plant Species from an Abandoned Tungsten Mining Area: Are They Useful for Biogeochemical Exploration and/or Phytoremediation Purposes?

Abstract

We aimed to evaluate the elemental (W, Mo, Zn, Fe, Cu, Co, Bi, Mn, Cd, Cr, As) composition of some plant species spread around the abandoned tungsten mining area of Uludağ Mountain. The plant species tested were Anthemis cretica and Trisetum flavescens which are grown in this area and they are pioneer species on these contaminated sites. W levels in soils were found up to 1378.6 ± 672.3 mg/kg dry weight in contaminated areas. The leaf W contents of the selected plant species were found 41.1 ± 24.4 and 31.1 ± 15.5 mg/kg dry weight for A. cretica and T. flavescens, respectively. Our results indicate that the elemental composition of species changed by the increased tungsten and some element concentrations in soil without detrimental effect. So, these species can be useful tungsten removal and some elements from contaminated sites.

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Acknowledgments

This work was presented at the 14th International Conference on Environmental Science and Technology (CEST 2015) and was supported by the Commission of Scientific Research Projects of Uludag University [Project No. KUAP(F)-2015/64]. This project was studied under permission of General Directorate of Nature Protection and Natural Parks of Republic of Turkey Ministry of Forestry and Water Affairs. The authors thank Ayca Cicek (M.S.c) and Gozde Dede (B.S.c) from the biology department for their help with sample preparation.

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Correspondence to Ümran Seven Erdemir.

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The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest. This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

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Erdemir, Ü.S., Arslan, H., Güleryüz, G. et al. Elemental Composition of Plant Species from an Abandoned Tungsten Mining Area: Are They Useful for Biogeochemical Exploration and/or Phytoremediation Purposes?. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 98, 299–303 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-016-1899-z

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Keywords

  • Tungsten
  • Mining activity
  • Trace element
  • Phytoremediation