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Lead Concentrations in Raw Cow and Goat Milk Collected in Rural Areas of Croatia from 2010 to 2014

Abstract

A total of 249 cow and 33 goat milk samples were collected in rural areas of Croatia during the period 2010–2014. Lead concentrations in milk samples were analyzed by graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectroscopy. Mean Pb concentrations in milk ranged from (μg/kg): cow 10.8–12.2; goat 9.33–60.0. The highest Pb level of 131 μg/kg in cow milk was measured during 2014. There were no significant differences in Pb levels between cow and goat milk and also in goat milk among the analysed years. However, significant differences were found in cow milk among years. The highest Pb was determined in 2011 (157 μg/kg in goat milk). The calculated estimated weekly intakes of Pb concentrations for cow and goat milk contribute only 1.37 % and 1.84 % to the provisional tolerable weekly intake. Therefore, the consumption of milk from both species should not pose a consumer health risk.

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Acknowledgments

The authors are thankful to Marijana Fluka and Mirjana Hren for assistance in sample preparation. This study was supported with a grant from the Croatian Veterinary Institute, Zagreb, Croatia.

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Correspondence to Nina Bilandžić.

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Bilandžić, N., Sedak, M., Čalopek, B. et al. Lead Concentrations in Raw Cow and Goat Milk Collected in Rural Areas of Croatia from 2010 to 2014. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 96, 645–649 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-016-1749-z

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Keywords

  • Lead
  • Cow milk
  • Goat milk
  • Atomic absorption spectroscopy
  • Croatia