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Morphological, Physiological and Biochemical Impact of Ink Industry Effluent on Germination of Maize (Zea mays), Barley (Hordeum vulgare) and Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor)

Abstract

The present study focuses on effects of untreated and treated ink industry wastewater on germination of maize, barley and sorghum. Wastewater had a high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and metal content compared to treated effluent. Germination decreased with increasing COD concentration. Speed of germination also followed the same trend, except for maize seeds exposed to untreated effluent (E), which germinated slightly faster than controls. These alterations of seedling development were mirrored by changes in soluble protein content. E exerted a positive effect on soluble protein content and maximum levels occurred after 10 days with treated effluent using coagulation/flocculation (TEc/f) process and treated effluent using combined process (coagulation/flocculation/biosorption) (TEc/f/b). Likewise, activity of α-amylase was influenced by effluent composition. Its expression depended on the species, exposure time and applied treatment. Nevertheless, current results indicated TEc/f/b had no observable toxic effects on germination and could be a beneficial alternative resource to irrigation water.

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Acknowledgments

This work was supported by grants from the Tunisian Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research. It was accomplished at the Faculty of Sciences of Sfax. Authors gratefully acknowledge the support of Mohamed Ayadi for technical assistance.

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Correspondence to Elleuch Amine.

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Zayneb, C., Lamia, K., Olfa, E. et al. Morphological, Physiological and Biochemical Impact of Ink Industry Effluent on Germination of Maize (Zea mays), Barley (Hordeum vulgare) and Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 95, 687–693 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-015-1600-y

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Keywords

  • Effluent treatment
  • Seedling mortality
  • Speed of germination
  • Soluble protein
  • α-amylase