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Correlations Between Some Hazardous Inorganic Pollutants in the Gomti River and Their Accumulation in Selected Macrophytes Under Aquatic Ecosystem

Abstract

Water quality of the Gomti River and phytoremediation potential of native macrophytes dwelling therein at six different sites were evaluated. River water showed high biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, nitrate, ammonium and phosphate (12.84, 77.94, 36.88, 6.04 and 2.25 mg L−1, respectively). Gomti water was found to be contaminated with different metals like Fe, Cd, Cu, Cr and Pb (5.54, 1.05, 3.74, 2.57 and 0.73 mg L−1, respectively). Macrophytes growing in the river accumulated considerable amounts of Fe, Cd, Cu, Cr and Pb in different parts. Among the studied plants, Eichhornia crassipes showed maximum remediation potential for Fe, Cd and Pb; Jussiaea repens for Cr; and Pistia stratiotes for Cd. However, in Typha latifolia, Cu accumulation was maximum. Except for Fe, translocation factor of E. crassipes, P. stratiotes, Hydrilla verticellata and T. latifolia was >1 for the studied metals, showing their potential to accumulate multiple metals in different plant parts.

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Correspondence to Rana Pratap Singh.

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Shah, A.B., Rai, U.N. & Singh, R.P. Correlations Between Some Hazardous Inorganic Pollutants in the Gomti River and Their Accumulation in Selected Macrophytes Under Aquatic Ecosystem. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 94, 783–790 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-015-1546-0

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Keywords

  • Bioaccumulation
  • Metals
  • Phytoremediation
  • Translocation factor