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Metals in Honeys from Different Areas of Southern Italy

Abstract

The aim of the study was to quantify the cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), chromium (Cr) and arsenic (As) contents in ninety honey samples from nine areas of southern Italy. Results showed that As content was below the detection limit, while Cd, Pb, and Cr contents were below the recommended maximum acceptable levels. Mean Cd, Pb, and Cr contents were 0.013, 0.289 and 0.707 mg kg−1, respectively. The metal contents in honey varied greatly depending on considered area. Correlations between the metals were statistically significant (p < 0.05), suggesting that polluting sources involve the simultaneous presence of metals in honey.

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Correspondence to Annamaria Perna.

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Perna, A., Intaglietta, I., Simonetti, A. et al. Metals in Honeys from Different Areas of Southern Italy. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 92, 253–258 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-013-1177-2

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Keywords

  • As
  • Cd
  • Pb
  • Cr
  • Environmental pollution
  • Geographical area