Skip to main content

Concentrations of Essential and Non-essential Toxic Trace Elements in Wild Boar (Sus Scrofa L., 1758) Tissues from Southern Turkey

Abstract

Wild animals, including wild boars, are suitable for use as bioindicators. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concentrations of selected essential (Co, Cu, Fe, Se, Zn) and non-essential (As, Cd, Pb) potentially toxic trace elements in various tissues (hair and hoof) of wild boars hunted in the vicinity of Antalya province in Turkey, in relation to hunting seasons. Concentrations in mg/kg on dry weight basis were determined as 0.37 ± 0.27 mg/kg for As, 0.05 ± 0.04 mg/kg for Cd, 0.24 ± 0.33 mg/kg for Co, 4.84 ± 2.48 mg/kg for Cu, 289.94 ± 165.26 mg/kg for Fe, 8.71 ± 15.68 mg/kg for Pb, 0.24 ± 0.10 mg/kg for Se, and 28.99 ± 21.41 mg/kg for Zn in the hair samples; and as 0.11 ± 0.04 mg/kg for As, 0.01 ± 0.04 mg/kg for Cd, 0.01 ± 0.01 mg/kg for Co, 1.03 ± 0.25 mg/kg for Cu, 56.88 ± 18.68 mg/kg for Fe, 0.30 ± 0.18 mg/kg for Pb, 0.11 ± 0.05 mg/kg for Se, and 17.91 ± 10.98 mg/kg for Zn in the hoof samples.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Fig. 1

References

  1. Amici A, Danieli PP, Russo C, Primi R, Ronchi B (2012) Concentrations of some toxic and trace elements in wild boar (Sus scrofa) organs and tissues in different areas of the Province of Viterbo, Central Italy. Ital J Anim Sci 11:65

    Article  Google Scholar 

  2. Bartolini C, Gavaudan S, Duranti A, DeCurtis M, Palombo P, Storaci M, Piersimoni A, Gaspari M, Tonucci F, Orletti R (2006) Cadmium contamination in wild boar (Sus Scrofa) in Marche Region. VIIth conference of the European wildlife disease association, Aosta Valley-Italy

  3. Bernard A (2011) Renal and neurological effects heavy metals in the environment. In: Nriagu JO (ed) Encyclopedia of environmental health. Elsevier, Burlington, pp 801–805

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  4. Bilandžić N, Sedak M, Dokić M, Šimić B (2012) Heavy metal concentrations in tissues of wild boar of continental croatia. IJEP 6:6–9

    Google Scholar 

  5. Bremner I (1974) Heavy metal toxicities. Q Rev Biophys 7:75–124

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  6. Brown PD (2011) Heavy metals in the natural and anthropic environments. In: Nriagu JO (ed) Encyclopedia of environmental health. Elsevier, Burlington, pp 315–322

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  7. Danieli PP, Serrani F, Primi R, Ponzetta MP, Ronchi B, Amici A (2012) Cadmium, lead, and chromium in large game: a local-scale exposure assessment for hunters consuming meat and liver of wild boar. Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 63:612–627

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  8. Dobrowolska A, Melosik M (2008) Bullet-derived lead in tissues of the wild boar (Sus scrofa) and red deer (Cervus elaphus). Eur J Wildl Res 54:231–235

    Article  Google Scholar 

  9. Duffy LK, Kaiser C, Ackley C, Richter KS (2001) Mercury in hair of large Alaskan Herbivores: routes of exposure. Alces 37:293–301

    Google Scholar 

  10. Ekici H, Yarsan E (2009) Substance that could have toxic effect on aquaculture animals. E.Ü J Fish Aquatic Sci (Electronic J) 26:229–233

    Google Scholar 

  11. EPA (2001) Trace elements in water, solids, and biosolids by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. Method 200.7. EPA-821-R-01-010

  12. Kaya S, Pirincci İ, Bilgili A (2002) Toxicology in veterinary medicine. 2nd Ed, Medisan, Ankara Turkey, pp 203–776

  13. Kong IC, Bitton G, Koopman B, Jung KH (1995) Heavy metal toxicity testing in environmental samples. Rev Environ Contam Toxicol 142:119–147

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  14. Kottferova J, Korèneková B (2000) Game as an indicator of environmental pollution by cadmium and lead. J Trace Microprobe Techniques 18:571–575

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  15. Kucharczak E, Jopek Z, Moryl A (2003) Influence of environment on content of selected metals (Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu) in tissues of roes and wild pigs. Medicina Veterinaria 2:37–47

    Google Scholar 

  16. Kuiters AT (1996) Accumulation of cadmium and lead in red deer and wild boar at the veluwe, the Netherlands. Vet Q 18:134–135

    Article  Google Scholar 

  17. Medvedev N (1999) Levels of heavy metals in karelian wildlife, 1989–1991. Environ Monit Assess 56:177–193

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  18. Milicevic DR, Jovanovic M, Juric VB, Petrovic ZI, Vukovic DZ (2010) Assessment of toxic elements content in swine kidneys. Arch Oncol 18:17–22

    Article  Google Scholar 

  19. O’Hara TM, Carroll G, Barboza P, Mueller K, Blake J, Woshner V, Willetto C (2001) Mineral and heavy metal status as related to a mortality event and poor recruitment in a Moose populatıon in Alaska. J Wildl Dis 37(3):509–522

    Article  Google Scholar 

  20. Piskorová L, Vasilková Z, Krupicer I (2003) Heavy metal residues in tissues of wild boar (Sus scrofa) and red fox (Vulpes vulpes) in the Central Zemplin region of the Slovak Republic. Czech J Anim Sci 48:134–138

    Google Scholar 

  21. Rensing C, Rosen BP (2009) Heavy metals cycle (Arsenic, Mercury, Selenium, others). In: Schaechter M (ed) Encyclopedia of microbiology, 3rd edn. Academic Press, Oxford, pp 205–219

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  22. Rodushkin I, Axelsson MD (2000) Application of double focusing sector field ICP-MS for multielemental characterization of human hair and nails. Part II. A study of the inhabitants of northern. Sci Total Environ 262:21–36

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  23. Saghaei S, Ekici H, Demirbas M, Yarsan E, Tumer I (2012) Determination of the metal contents of honey samples from Orumieh in Iran. Kafkas Univ Vet Fak Derg 18:281–284

    Google Scholar 

  24. Santiago D, Motas-Guzmán M, Reja A, María-Mojica P, Rodero B, García-Fernández AJ (1998) Lead and cadmium in red deer and wild boar from Sierra Morena Mountains (Andalusia, Spain). Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 61:730–737

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  25. Sobańska MA (2005) Wild boar hair (Sus scrofa) as a non-invasive indicator of mercury pollution. Sci Total Environ 339:81–88

    Article  Google Scholar 

  26. Srebočan E, Crnić AP, Ekert-Kabalin AM, Lazarus M, Jurasović J, Tomljanović K, An Dreić D, Ak Perović I, Čož-Rakovac SR (2011) Cadmium, lead, and mercury concentrations in tissues of roe deer (Capreolus capreolus L.) and wild boar (Sus scrofa L.) from Iowland Croatia. Czech J Food Sci 6:624–633

    Google Scholar 

  27. Wolkers H, Wensing T, Geert WTA (1994) Groot Bruinderink, Heavy metal contamination in organs of red deer (Cervus elaphus) and wild boar (Sus scrofa) and the effect on some trace elements. Sci Total Environ 144:191–199

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  28. Yarsan E, Bilgili A, Sagmanligil H, Cetinkaya N (1995) The natural quality of Van Lake and the levels of some heavy metals in grey mullet (Chalcalburus tariehi, Pallas 1811) samples taken from this lake. Vet J Ankara Uni 42:445–450

    Google Scholar 

  29. Yarsan E, Karacal F, Ibrahim IG, Dikmen B, Koksal A, Das YK (2007a) Contents of some metals in honeys from different regions in Turkey. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 79:255–258

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  30. Yarsan E, Baskaya R, Yildiz A, Altintas L, Yesilot S (2007b) Copper, lead, cadmium and mercury concentrations in the mussel Elliptio. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 79:218–220

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  31. Yipel M (2012) Determination of some heavy metal levels of red mullet (Mullus barbatus, Linnaeus, 1758), Grey Mullet (Mugil cephalus, Linnaeus, 1758) and Green Tiger Prawn (Panaeus semisulcatus, De Haan, 1844) Species Caught in the Gulf of Antalya Mediterranean Sea, PhD. Thesis

  32. Zaccaroni A, Andreani G, Zucchini M, Merendi F, Simoni P (2003) Heavy metals in wild boar (Sus Scrofa) and related lesions. IV Congr. It. Teriologia. Hystrix, It. J. Mamm 174–175

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Ender Yarsan.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Yarsan, E., Yipel, M., Dikmen, B. et al. Concentrations of Essential and Non-essential Toxic Trace Elements in Wild Boar (Sus Scrofa L., 1758) Tissues from Southern Turkey. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 92, 10–14 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-013-1134-0

Download citation

Keywords

  • Environmental pollution
  • Hair
  • Hoof
  • Potentially toxic trace elements
  • Wild boar