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Bioaccumulation of Dietary Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) by the Polychaete, Perinereis nuntia

Abstract

To investigate the biomagnification factor (BMF) of EDCs by the polychaete, Perinereis nuntia, organisms were exposed to EDCs through their diet. BMF values ranged from 0.001 to 0.028 indicating that EDCs were not biomagnified. Elimination rates were (0.20–0.25 day−1) and were higher than uptake rate (0.0003–0.003 day−1) verifying that EDCs were not biomagnified by P. nuntia due to their fast elimination. The calculated half-life of each EDC in this study varies from 2.76 to 3.45 days. Overall, the findings from this study demonstrated that the studied EDCs are not biomagnified in P. nuntia but exposure does occur from the diet.

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Acknowledgments

The present study were financially supported by the program of EXTEND 2010 of Japanese Ministry of Environment.

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Correspondence to Jiro Koyama.

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Nurulnadia, M.Y., Koyama, J., Uno, S. et al. Bioaccumulation of Dietary Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) by the Polychaete, Perinereis nuntia . Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 91, 372–376 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-013-1073-9

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Keywords

  • Biomagnification
  • Dietary
  • EDC
  • Perinereis nuntia