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Biosurfactant Production by Marine Bacterial Isolates from the Venezuelan Atlantic Front

Abstract

Our purpose was to detect, isolate and characterize tensioactive agents with or without emulsifying activity from marine bacterial strains present in seawater and sediment samples from the Venezuelan Atlantic Front. Biosurfactants found in cell-free supernatants from all cultures presented high surface activity as they were able to reduce the water surface tension from 72 dynes cm−1 to values between 41.7 and 33.9 dynes cm−1. However, high indirect CMC values were registered for the most of these compounds (51.4 %–56.1 % v/v). Culture supernatants from S3 and S29 strains showed highest emulsifying activity in the dispersion assay with diesel oil (absorbance 1.06 and 1.18, respectively), while supernatant from the S10 strain induced the most stable oil-in-water emulsions with 16° and 25°API crude oils. Only culture supernatant from S3 strain was able to produce stable oil-in water emulsions with diesel oil and both type of crude oils.

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Acknowledgments

We gratefully acknowledge the financial support from Projects of INTEVEP-PDVSA and the Decanato de Investigación y Desarrollo of the Universidad Simón Bolívar.

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Correspondence to Lorelei Bozo-Hurtado.

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Bozo-Hurtado, L., Rocha, C.A., Malavé, R. et al. Biosurfactant Production by Marine Bacterial Isolates from the Venezuelan Atlantic Front. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 89, 1068–1072 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-012-0820-7

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Keywords

  • Biosurfactant
  • Marine bacteria
  • Venezuelan Atlantic front