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Arsenic and Chromium in Sea Foods from Niger Delta of Nigeria: A Case Study of Warri, Delta State

Abstract

This study determined the concentration of Arsenic and Chromium in sea foods samples from Ethiope River. The sea foods were bought from different locations along the bank of the river. Arsenic concentration ranged from 0.046 ± 0.01 to 0.083 ± 0.05 mg/kg, while the chromium concentration ranged from 0.079 ± 0.04 to 0.152 ± 0.14 mg/kg. Palaemon serratus has the highest concentration of arsenic and chromium, 152 ± 0.14 mg/kg and 0.081 ± 0.04 mg/kg respectively, while Harengula jaguana has the lowest concentration of arsenic and chromium, 0.079 ± 0.04 mg/kg and 0.046 ± 0.01 mg/kg respectively. There are various oil prospecting companies and oil and gas related industries in this area which discharge untreated waste products into Ethiope River. In view of this, there is need to determine the level of arsenic and chromium contamination of the river, since the inhabitants depend on the river for fishing and other domestic uses.

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Acknowledgments

We wish to thank the Vice Chancellor, Abia State University, Prof Chibuzo Ogbuagu for his interest and financial support for this investigation.

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Correspondence to Friday O. Uhegbu.

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Uhegbu, F.O., Chinyere, G.C., Ugbogu, A.E. et al. Arsenic and Chromium in Sea Foods from Niger Delta of Nigeria: A Case Study of Warri, Delta State. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 89, 424–427 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-012-0667-y

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Keywords:

  • Sea foods
  • Heavy metals
  • Toxicants
  • Contaminants
  • Health hazards