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Modeled Dosage–Response Relationship on the Net Photosynthetic Rate for the Sensitivity to Acid Rain of 21 Plant Species

Abstract

This study investigated the sensitivity of plant species to acid rain based on the modeled dosage–response relationship on the net photosynthetic rate (P N) of 21 types of plant species, subjected to the exposure of simulated acid rain (SAR) for 5 times during a period of 50 days. Variable responses of P N to SAR occurred depending on the type of plant. A majority (13 species) of the dosage–response relationship could be described by an S-shaped curve and be fitted with the Boltzmann model. Model fitting allowed quantitative evaluation of the dosage–response relationship and an accurate estimation of the EC10, termed as the pH of the acid rain resulting in a P N 10 % lower than the reference value. The top 9 species (Camellia sasanqua, Cinnamomum camphora, etc. EC10 ≤ 3.0) are highly endurable to very acid rain. The rare, relict plant Metasequoia glyptostroboides was the most sensitive species (EC10 = 5.1) recommended for protection.

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Acknowledgments

This study was funded by the Ministry of Science and Technology of the People’s Republic of China for the project titled “Special Sub-topic on Sifting, Selection, and Rapid Culturing of Plant Species Endurable to Acid Rain (2006BAD03A0104-2)” in the framework of the ‘11th Five Year’ National Scientific and Technological Key Research Scheme.

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Correspondence to Shihuai Deng.

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Shihuai Deng, Shuzhen Gou, and Baiye Sun are co-first authors and have equally contributed to this paper.

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Deng, S., Gou, S., Sun, B. et al. Modeled Dosage–Response Relationship on the Net Photosynthetic Rate for the Sensitivity to Acid Rain of 21 Plant Species. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 89, 251–256 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-012-0661-4

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Keywords

  • Simulated acid rain
  • Net photosynthetic rate
  • Dosage–response relationship
  • Species sensitivity