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Effect of Vitamin E Supplementation on Arsenic Induced Oxidative Stress in Goats

Abstract

The present study was designed to assess whether supplementation of different levels of vitamin E to long-term arsenic exposed goats affords protection against the oxidative stress caused by the metalloid. Twenty-four crossbred lactating goats were distributed randomly into four groups (control, T1, T2 and T3) of six in each. The animals in T1, T2 and T3 were given 50 mg/kg DM arsenic daily, while in T2 and T3, vitamin E @100 IU and 150 IU/kg DM, respectively, was also supplemented additionally for the period of 12 months. Compared to control, significant (p < 0.05) decline in SOD (45 %), CAT activities of erythrocytes (63 %), plasma total Ig (22 %) and total antioxidant activity (24 %) was observed in only arsenic treated groups and vitamin E supplementation in both doses produced partial mitigation effect against SOD (23 %, 20 %) and CAT (39 %, 48 %) while complete mitigation against total Ig (16 %, 7 %) and antioxidant activity (10 %, 8 %) was found. Average lymphocyte stimulation index at the end of experiment was (p < 0.05) lower in arsenic exposed groups (1.003 ± 0.01) and significant (p < 0.05) recovery was observed in response of vitamin E supplementation at higher doses (1.138 ± 0.03). So, vitamin E is helpful in reducing the burden of arsenic induced oxidative stress and activities of antioxidant enzymes in goats.

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Acknowledgments

Authors would like to express their sincere thanks to the Director of the Institute for providing necessary helps.

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Correspondence to T. K. Das.

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Das, T.K., Mani, V., Kaur, H. et al. Effect of Vitamin E Supplementation on Arsenic Induced Oxidative Stress in Goats. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 89, 61–66 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-012-0620-0

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Keywords

  • Arsenic
  • Oxidative stress
  • Goat
  • Vitamin E