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Organochlorine Contaminants and Quality of Olive Oil Collected from Olive Oil Growers along the Croatian Adriatic Coast

Abstract

In this study we assessed 48 samples of virgin olive oil collected along the Croatian Adriatic coast for quality control, and for the presence of residues of seven organochlorine pesticides and 17 congeners of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Organochlorine pesticide levels ranged between below the limit of determination and 3.7 ng g−1 of oil, while PCBs ranged between below the limit of determination and 1.8 ng g−1 of oil. A larger problem than the presence of organochlorine compounds was that the seven tested oils (out of 48) did not meet some quality standards.

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Correspondence to Snježana Herceg Romanić.

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Herceg Romanić, S., Matek Sarić, M. & Klinčić, D. Organochlorine Contaminants and Quality of Olive Oil Collected from Olive Oil Growers along the Croatian Adriatic Coast. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 87, 574 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-011-0370-4

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Keywords

  • PCBs
  • OCPs
  • Olive oil
  • Quality parameters