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Johor Strait as a Hotspot for Trace Elements Contamination in Peninsular Malaysia

Abstract

Present study was conducted to evaluate current status of trace elements contamination in the surface sediments of the Johor Strait. Iron (2.54 ± 1.24%) was found as the highest occurring element, followed by those of zinc (210.45 ± 115.4 μg/g), copper (57.84 ± 45.54 μg/g), chromium (55.50 ± 31.24 μg/g), lead (52.52 ± 28.41 μg/g), vanadium (47.76 ± 25.76 μg/g), arsenic (27.30 ± 17.11 μg/g), nickel (18.31 ± 11.77 μg/g), cobalt (5.13 ± 3.12 μg/g), uranium (4.72 ± 2.52 μg/g), and cadmium (0.30 ± 0.30 μg/g), respectively. Bioavailability of cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, arsenic and cadmium were higher than 50% of total concentration. Vanadium, copper, zinc, arsenic and cadmium were found significantly different between the eastern and western part of the strait (p < 0.05). Combining with other factors, Johor Strait is suitable as a hotspot for trace elements contamination related studies.

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Acknowledgments

This study was supported by a grant-in-aid from Scientific Program (No. 19380224), the Multilateral Core University Program “Coastal Marine Science” from the Japan Society for Promotion of Science, and the eScienceFund (Project No. 06-01-04-SF0715) from the Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation of Malaysia.

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Correspondence to Syaizwan Zahmir Zulkifli or Ahmad Ismail.

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Zulkifli, S.Z., Ismail, A., Mohamat-Yusuff, F. et al. Johor Strait as a Hotspot for Trace Elements Contamination in Peninsular Malaysia. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 84, 568–573 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-010-9998-8

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Keywords

  • Johor Strait
  • Sediments
  • Trace elements
  • Bioavailability
  • Hotspot