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Mercury Concentrations in Quagga Mussels, Dreissena bugensis, from Lakes Mead, Mohave and Havasu

Abstract

The recent invasion of the Dressenid species, the quagga mussel, Dreissena bugensis, into Lakes Mead, Mohave and Havasu has raised questions about their ability to alter contaminant cycling. Mussels were collected from 25 locations in the three lakes. The overall average was 0.036 ± 0.016 μg g−1 Hg dry wt. The range of the three lakes was from 0.014–0.093 μg g−1 Hg dry wt. There were no significant differences in mercury concentrations among the three lakes (F = 0.07; p = 0.794). From this baseline data of contaminants in quagga mussels from the lower Colorado River, this species may be used to biomonitor lake health.

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Acknowledgments

We thank Bryan Moore and Ross Haley from the National Park Service in Boulder City, NV and Carieen Ulepic from the Bureau of Reclamation in Boulder City, NV for the collection of mussels. Chris Rendina and Lanisa Pechacek assisted in the sorting and preparation of mussels for analysis.

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Correspondence to Shawn L. Gerstenberger.

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Mueting, S.A., Gerstenberger, S.L. Mercury Concentrations in Quagga Mussels, Dreissena bugensis, from Lakes Mead, Mohave and Havasu. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 84, 497–501 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-010-9953-8

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Keywords

  • Mercury
  • Quagga mussel
  • Lower colorado river
  • Invasive species