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Protective Role of Curcumin on Lindane Induced Reproductive Toxicity in Male Wistar Rats

Abstract

The aim of this study was to explore the adverse effects of lindane pesticide on testes and epididymus weight, sperm head counts, sperm motility, abnormal changes in sperm morphology, biochemical changes in endogenous antioxidants and oxidative enzymes in male wistar rats as well as to assess ameliorating role of ‘curcumin’. Rats were exposed daily to lindane (30 mg/kgbw) for 14 and 28 days and administered with curcumin (100 mg/kgbw) in pretreatment, post treatment and combination groups. We observed decrease (p < 0.001) in testes and cauda epididymus weight, decrease (p < 0.001) in testicular sperm head count, increase (p < 0.001) in abnormal tail morphology (headless tail, multiple tail, broken tail, coiled tail and bent tail), abnormal head morphology (excessive hook, amorphous head, pin head, short head, blunt hook and detached hook) and decrease (p < 0.001) in sperm motility after lindane exposure, as compared to control. There was (p < 0.01) decline in superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione-s-transferase activity on lindane exposure, however, no change (p > 0.05) was observed in glutathione level. Lipid peroxidation was (p < 0.01) enhanced on lindane exposure as compared to control. Curcumin administration was able to ameliorate lindane induced reproductive toxicity in pretreatment, post treatment and combination groups. The study indicated that even after 14 days of metabolism, toxic effects of lindane were evident.

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Correspondence to Rambir Singh.

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Sharma, P., Singh, R. Protective Role of Curcumin on Lindane Induced Reproductive Toxicity in Male Wistar Rats. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 84, 378–384 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-010-9942-y

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Keywords

  • Lindane
  • Curcumin
  • Male wistar rats
  • Reproductive toxicity