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Distribution of Cd and Zn Levels in Soils and Acacia xanthophloea Benth. from Lake Nakuru National Park Kenya

Abstract

Cadmium and zinc from anthropogenic sources in Lake Nakuru were investigated. High metal levels (mg/kg) in soils (Cd ≤ 16.3 and Zn ≤ 280) and Acacia xanthophloea (Cd ≤ 32 and Zn ≤ 310) were observed at polluted sites. Significant variations in metal values were evaluated using ANOVA (F test) and student’s t test at p < 0.05 and metal correlations studied. High levels of metals in soils and unhealthy/dying Acacia were obtained at polluted sites. Significant positive correlation was obtained between Cd and Zn in soils and plants. Acacia sp are effective biomonitor of environmental quality in areas subjected to pollution.

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Acknowledgments

We wish to thank Mr Bore of Mines and Geology Department for permission to use AAS and the Director of Wildlife Services Kenya, the Chief Scientist and the Senior Warden of Lake Nakuru National Park for granting us permission to work in the park.

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Correspondence to N. Dharani.

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Dharani, N., Onyari, J.M., Kinyamario, J.I. et al. Distribution of Cd and Zn Levels in Soils and Acacia xanthophloea Benth. from Lake Nakuru National Park Kenya. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 85, 318–323 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-010-0033-x

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Keywords

  • Cadmium
  • Zinc
  • Soils
  • Acacia