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Biochemical and Physiological Responses of Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Grown on Different Sewage Sludge Amendments Rates

Abstract

Using sewage sludge, a biological residue from sewage treatment processes, in agriculture is an alternative disposal technique of waste. To study the biochemical and physiological responses of Rice (Oryza sativa L.) grown on different sewage sludge amendments (SSA) rates a field experiment was conducted by mixing sewage sludge at 0, 3, 4.5, 6, 9, 12 kg m−2 rate to the agricultural soil. Rate of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance increased in plants grown at different SSA rate. Chlorophyll and protein contents also increased due to different SSA rates. Lipid peroxidation, ascorbic acid, peroxidase activity and proline content increased, however, thiol and phenol content decreased in plants grown at different SSA rates. The study concludes that for rice plant sewage sludge amendment in soil may be a good option as plant has adequate heavy metal tolerance mechanism showed by increased rate of photosynthesis and chlorophyll content and various antioxidant levels.

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Acknowledgments

We are thankful to Farm Incharge, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University for providing field facilities and Head, Department of Botany, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi for providing necessary facilities during the research work. Mr. R. P. Singh is also thankful to Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi for awarding Senior Research Fellowship.

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Correspondence to R. P. Singh.

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Singh, R.P., Agrawal, M. Biochemical and Physiological Responses of Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Grown on Different Sewage Sludge Amendments Rates. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 84, 606–612 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-010-0007-z

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Keywords

  • Sewage sludge amendment
  • Heavy metals
  • Physiological responses
  • Oryza sativa