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Field Studies on the Environmental Factors in Controlling Microcystin Production in the Subtropical Shallow Lakes of the Yangtze River

Abstract

Microcystin (MC) problem made more and more care about in China, intercellular MC (Int-MC) and cellular MC (Cel-MC) were important contents to reflect the producing-MC ability by cyanobacteria and by lakes. To study the correlations between Int-MC, Cel-MC concentration and biological and environmental factors, eight cyanobacterial blooming lakes were studied in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River. Microcystin-RR (MC-RR) and Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) were the primary toxin variants in our data. From the linear correlations between MC and environmental factors, cellular-YR had significant correlation with most of chemical factors except total nitrogen (TN) and the ratio of total nitrogen and total phosphorus (TN/TP), most intracellular MC analogues had significant correlations with total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), ammonium (NH +4 ), nitrite (NO 2 ), TP, total dissolved phosphorus (TDP), Microcystis. From the canonal correspondence analysis, Int-MC concentrations were closely related with the chemical and biological factors, such as TP, total organic carbon (TOC), chlorophyll a (Chl a), Microcystis biomass, et al. While Cel-MC contents, especially Cel-RR and Cel-LR, were closely related with light environmental in the lakes such as water depth and transparence.

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Acknowledgments

This work was supported by a key project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KZCX1-SW-12) and by a fund from National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 30225011). We thank Prof. Wang H Z for the guidance and Wu A P, Wang H J, Cui Y D, Pang B Z, Wang Z X and Liang X M for assistance in sampling and experimental methods.

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Correspondence to P. Xie.

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Wu, S., Wang, S., Yang, H. et al. Field Studies on the Environmental Factors in Controlling Microcystin Production in the Subtropical Shallow Lakes of the Yangtze River. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 80, 329–334 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-008-9378-9

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Keywords

  • Microcystin
  • Microcystis
  • Shallow lakes
  • The Yangtze River