Distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Edible Fish from Gomti River, India

Abstract

This study reports the levels and distribution patterns of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fish samples of the Gomti river, India, collected from three sites during the pre- and post-monsoon seasons of the years 2004–2005. In the fish muscles, ∑PAHs ranged between 12.85 and 34.89 ng g−1 wet wt (mean value: 23.98 ± 6.70 ng g−1). Naphthalene was the most prevalent compound both in terms of detection as well as levels, while, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo(a)pyrene, and indeno(123-cd)pyrene + benzo(ghi)perylene could not be detected in any of the sample. Low-molecular weight PAHs were observed dominating over the high molecular weight PAHs.

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Acknowledgment

The authors are thankful to the Director, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, Lucknow, for his consistent support and interest in this work.

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Correspondence to Kunwar P. Singh.

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Malik, A., Ojha, P. & Singh, K.P. Distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Edible Fish from Gomti River, India. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 80, 134–138 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00128-007-9331-3

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Keywords

  • PAHs
  • Channa punctatus
  • Fish muscles
  • POPs