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Secondhand smoke exposure and mental health in adults: a meta-analysis of cross-sectional studies

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies assessing secondhand smoke (SHS) and risk of mental health problems have yielded inconsistent results. We performed a meta-analysis to statistically assess the association between SHS exposure, depressive symptoms and psychological distress among adults.

Methods

A systematically search of Pubmed (1946–2015) and EMBASE (1976–2015) was conducted and supplemented by bibliographies of all retrieved articles to find additional relevant citations. Odds ratios (OR) and associated 95 % confidence interval (CI) of each eligible study were extracted and pooled in our meta-analysis.

Results

A total of 11 studies comprising 86,739 participants met the inclusion criteria. A random-effect model was used in meta-analysis since considerable heterogeneity was expected. Our results indicate that SHS exposure was significantly associated with depressive symptoms (OR 1.60, 95 % CI 1.35–1.90) and psychological distress (OR 1.32, 95 % CI 1.11–1.56).

Conclusion

Exposure to SHS among non-smoker is associated with depressive symptoms and psychological distress, emphasizing the significance of reducing SHS exposure at a population level.

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Correspondence to Ya-Min Li.

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Zeng, YN., Li, YM. Secondhand smoke exposure and mental health in adults: a meta-analysis of cross-sectional studies. Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol 51, 1339–1348 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00127-015-1164-5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00127-015-1164-5

Keywords

  • Depressive symptoms
  • Psychological disorder
  • Secondhand smoke
  • Meta-analysis