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Risk factors for depression in truck drivers

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Abstract

Objective

Depression is a major public health problem. Work stress is associated with depression and workers whose jobs impose high levels of psychological demands, such as truck drivers, may be at increased risk. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and correlates of depression in truck drivers.

Method

This was a cross-sectional study of 300 male truck drivers. Presence and severity of depression were assessed by the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview followed by the Beck Depression Inventory Short Form. Relevant demographic, clinical and occupational data were collected using a purpose-built questionnaire.

Results

The prevalence of depression among truck drivers was 13.6%. Multivariate analysis showed that being 45 years or older had a protective effect (OR = 0.19; P = 0.02), whereas low educational level (OR = 3.03; P = 0.01), use of stimulants (OR = 5.03; P < 0.01) and wage-earning (OR = 2.84; P = 0.01), as opposed to self-employment, increased the risk for depression.

Conclusions

Truck drivers are at increased risk for depression when compared to the general population. Efforts to increase awareness of this problem and to limit the use of stimulants, as well as measures to improve job satisfaction, particularly among the wage-earning drivers, may have a positive impact on mental health in these workers.

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Correspondence to Pedro Felipe Carvalhedo de Bruin MD, PhD.

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da Silva-Júnior, F.P., de Pinho, R.S.N., de Mello, M.T. et al. Risk factors for depression in truck drivers. Soc Psychiat Epidemiol 44, 125–129 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00127-008-0412-3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00127-008-0412-3

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