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Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 104, Issue 2–3, pp 286–293 | Cite as

Characterization of trinucleotide SSR motifs in wheat

  • Q. J. Song
  • E. W. Fickus
  • P. B. Cregan

Abstract 

Length differences among trinucleotide-based microsatellite alleles can be more easily detected and frequently produce fewer ”stutter bands” as compared to dinucleotide-based microsatellite markers. Our objective was to determine which trinucleotide motif(s) would be the most-polymorphic and abundant source of trinucleotide microsatellite markers in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Four genomic libraries of cultivar ’Chinese Spring’ were screened with nine trinucleotide probes. Based on the screening of 28550 clones, the occurrences of (CTT/GAA) n , (GGA/CCT) n , (TAA/ATT) n , (CAA/GTT) n , (GGT/CCA) n , (CAT/GTA) n , (CGA/GCT) n , (CTA/GAT) n , and (CGT/GCA) n repeats were estimated to be 5.4×104, 3.5×104, 3.2×104, 1.2×104, 6.3×103, 4.9×103, 4.5×103, 4.5×103 and 3.6×103, i.e., once every 293 kbp, 456 kbp, 500 kbp, 1.3 Mbp, 2.6 Mbp, 3.2 Mbp, 3.6 Mbp, 3.6 Mbp and 4.5 Mbp in the wheat genome, respectively. Of 236 clones selected for sequencing, 38 (93%) (TAA/ATT) n , 30 (43%) (CTT/GAA) n , 16 (59%) (CAA/GTT) n , 3 (27%) (CAT/GTA) n and 2 (4%) (GGA/CCT) n clones contained microsatellites with eight or more perfect repeats. From these data, 29, 27 and 16 PCR primer sets were designed and tested to the (TAA/ATT) n , (CTT/GAA) n and (CAA/GTT) n microsatellites, respectively. A total of 12 (41.4%) primers designed to (TAA/ATT) n , four (14.8%) to (CTT/GAA) n , and two (12.5%) to (CAA/GTT) n resulted in polymorphic markers. The results indicated that (TAA/ATT) n microsatellites would provide the most-abundant and the most-polymorphic source of trinucleotide microsatellite markers in wheat.

Keywords Wheat Simple sequence repeat (SSR) Microsatellites Trinucleotide motifs Molecular markers 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Q. J. Song
    • 1
  • E. W. Fickus
    • 2
  • P. B. Cregan
    • 2
  1. 1.Building 006, Soybean Genomics and Improvement Laboratory, USDA, ARS, Beltsville Agriculture Research Center, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA (A visiting scientist from Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, 210095, P. R. China)CN
  2. 2.Building 006, Soybean Genomics and Improvement Laboratory, USDA, ARS, Beltsville Agriculture Research Center, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA e-mail: creganp@ba.ars.usda.govUS

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