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Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 99, Issue 1–2, pp 16–26 | Cite as

A high-density genetic linkage map of Aegilops tauschii, the D-genome progenitor of bread wheat

  • E. V. Boyko
  • K. S. Gill
  • L. Mickelson-Young
  • S. Nasuda
  • W. J. Raupp
  • J. N. Ziegle
  • S. Singh
  • D. S. Hassawi
  • A. K. Fritz
  • D. Namuth
  • N. L. V. Lapitan
  • B. S. Gill

Abstract

Aegilops tauschii is the diploid D-genome progenitor of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em Thell, 2n=6x=42, AABBDD). A genetic linkage map of the Ae. tauschii genome was constructed, composed of 546 loci. One hundred and thirty two loci (24%) gave distorted segregation ratios. Sixty nine probes (13%) detected multiple copies in the genome. One hundred and twenty three of the 157 markers shared between the Ae. tauschii genetic and T. aestivum physical maps were colinear. The discrepancy in the order of five markers on the Ae. tauschii 3DS genetic map versus the T. aestivum 3D physical map indicated a possible inversion. Further work is needed to verify the discrepancies in the order of markers on the 4D, 5D and 7D Ae. tauschii genetic maps versus the physical and genetic maps of T. aestivum. Using common markers, 164 agronomically important genes were assigned to specific regions on Ae. tauschii linkage, and T. aestivum physical, maps. This information may be useful for map-based cloning and marker-assisted plant breeding.

Key words Aegilops tauschii Triticum aestivum Genetic mapping Molecular markers Agronomically important genes 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. V. Boyko
    • 1
  • K. S. Gill
    • 2
  • L. Mickelson-Young
    • 1
  • S. Nasuda
    • 3
  • W. J. Raupp
    • 1
  • J. N. Ziegle
    • 4
  • S. Singh
    • 5
  • D. S. Hassawi
    • 6
  • A. K. Fritz
    • 7
  • D. Namuth
    • 8
  • N. L. V. Lapitan
    • 8
  • B. S. Gill
    • 1
  1. 1.Wheat Genetics Resource Center and Department of Plant Pathology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA Fax:+1-785-532-5692 E-mail: bsg@ksu.eduUS
  2. 2.Department of Agronomy, 279 Plant Science, P.O. Box 830915, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68583-091, USAUS
  3. 3.Laboratory of Plant Genetics, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-01, JapanJP
  4. 4.Perkin Elmer, Applied Biosystems Division, 850 Lincoln Centre Drive, Foster City, CA 94404, USAUS
  5. 5.Biotechnology Centre, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana 141004, Punjab, IndiaIN
  6. 6.Al-Balga Applied University, Faculty of Agricultural Technology, Al-Salt, Jordan 19117JO
  7. 7.Southern Crop Improvement Facility and Department of Soil and Crop Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-2123, USAUS
  8. 8.Department of Soil and Crop Sciences, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO 80523, USAUS

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