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Camalexin induction in intertribal somatic hybrids between Camelina sativa and rapid-cycling Brassica oleracea

Abstract

Camelina sativa, a wild relative of Brassica crops, is virtually immune to blackspot disease caused by Alternaria brassicicola. Intertribal somatic hybrids were produced between C. sativa and rapid-cycling Brassica oleracea as a step toward the transfer of resistance to this disease into Brassica vegetable crops. The plants recovered were confirmed as somatic hybrids by flow cytometry and RAPD analysis. All hybrids showed a morphology intermediate between the two parents. Rooted plants grew in soil up to 4–5 weeks, and some produced sterile flowers. Two of three hybrids tested showed a high level of resistance to  A. brassicicola. Resistance was correlated with the induction of high levels of the phytoalexin camalexin 48 h after inoculation, as in the resistant Camelina fusion partner. In contrast, susceptible somatic hybrids produced much lower levels of camalexin.

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Received: 2 April 1998 / Accepted: 14 July 1998

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Sigareva, M., Earle, E. Camalexin induction in intertribal somatic hybrids between Camelina sativa and rapid-cycling Brassica oleracea. Theor Appl Genet 98, 164–170 (1999). https://doi.org/10.1007/s001220051053

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  • Key words Intertribal somatic hybrids
  • Brassica
  • Camelina sativa
  • Alternaria
  • Camalexin