Advertisement

Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 127, Issue 1, pp 241–250 | Cite as

Characterization and genetic mapping of a Photoperiod-sensitive dwarf 1 locus in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

  • Riqing Li
  • Jixing Xia
  • Yiwei Xu
  • Xiucai Zhao
  • Yao-Guang LiuEmail author
  • Yuanling ChenEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Plant height is an important agronomic trait for crop architecture and yield. Most known factors determining plant height function in gibberellin or brassinosteroid biosynthesis or signal transduction. Here, we report a japonica rice (Oryza sativa ssp. japonica) dominant dwarf mutant, Photoperiod-sensitive dwarf 1 (Psd1). The Psd1 mutant showed impaired cell division and elongation, and a severe dwarf phenotype under long-day conditions, but nearly normal growth in short-day. The plant height of Psd1 mutant could not be rescued by gibberellin or brassinosteroid treatment. Genetic analysis with R1 and F2 populations determined that Psd1 phenotype was controlled by a single dominant locus. Linkage analysis with 101 tall F2 plants grown in a long-day season, which were derived from a cross between Psd1 and an indica cultivar, located Psd1 locus on chromosome 1. Further fine-mapping with 1017 tall F2 plants determined this locus on an 11.5-kb region. Sequencing analysis of this region detected a mutation site in a gene encoding a putative lipid transfer protein; the mutation produces a truncated C-terminus of the protein. This study establishes the genetic foundation for understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating plant cell division and elongation mediated by interaction between genetic and environmental factors.

Keywords

Plant Height Tall Plant Dwarf Phenotype Dwarf Mutant Average Plant Height 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by grants from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31271301) and the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2012AA10A303).

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

122_2013_2213_MOESM1_ESM.doc (2 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 2068 kb)

References

  1. Chae K, Kieslich CA, Morikis D, Kim SC, Lord EM (2009) A gain-of-function mutation of Arabidopsis lipid transfer protein 5 disturbs pollen tube tip growth and fertilization. Plant Cell 21:3902–3914PubMedCentralPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Gomi K, Sasaki A, Itoh H, Ueguchi-Tanaka M, Ashikari M, Kitano H, Matsuoka M (2004) GID2, an F-box subunit of the SCF E3 complex, specifically interacts with phosphorylated SLR1 protein and regulates the gibberellin-dependent degradation of SLR1 in rice. Plant J 37:626–634PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. He JX, Gendron JM, Yang Y, Li J, Wang ZY (2002) The GSK3-like kinase BIN2 phosphorylates and destabilizes BZR1, a positive regulator of the brassinosteroid signaling pathway in Arabidopsis. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 99:10185–10190PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Hedden P (2003) The genes of the green revolution. Trends Genet 19:5–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Hong Z, Ueguchi-Tanaka M, Umemura K, Uozu S, Fujioka S, Takatsuto S, Yoshida S, Ashikari M, Kitano H, Matsuoka M (2003) A rice brassinosteroid-deficient mutant, ebisu dwarf (d2), is caused by a loss of function of a new member of cytochrome P450. Plant Cell 15:2900–2910PubMedCentralPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Hong Z, Ueguchi-Tanaka M, Umemura K (2004) Brassinosteroids and rice architecture. J Pestic Sci 29:184–188CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Ikeda A, Ueguchi-Tanaka M, Sonoda Y, Kitano H, Koshioka M, Futsuhara Y, Matsuoka M, Yamaguchi J (2001) Slender rice, a constitutive gibberellin response mutant, is caused by a null mutation of the SLR1 gene, an ortholog of the height-regulating gene GAI/RGA/RHT/D8. Plant Cell 13:999–1010PubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Ishikawa S, Maekawa M, Arite T, Onishi K, Takamure I, Kyozuka J (2005) Suppression of tiller bud activity in tillering dwarf mutants of rice. Plant Cell Physiol 46:79–86PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Jiang H, Guo L, Qian Q (2007) Recent progress on rice genetics in China. J Integr Plant Biol 49:776–790Google Scholar
  10. Komorisono M, Ueguchi-Tanaka M, Aichi I, Hasegawa Y, Ashikari M, Kitano H, Matsuoka M, Sazuka T (2005) Analysis of the rice mutant dwarf and gladius leaf 1. Aberrant katanin-mediated microtubule organization causes up-regulation of gibberellin biosynthetic genes independently of gibberellin signaling. Plant Physiol 138:1982–1993PubMedCentralPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Lander ES, Green P, Abrahamson J, Barlow A, Daly MJ, Lincoln SE, Newberg LA (1987) MAPMAKER: an interactive computer package for constructing primary genetic linkage maps of experimental and natural populations. Genomics 1:174–181PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Li J, Wen J, Lease KA, Doke JT, Tax FE, Walker JC (2002) BAK1, an Arabidopsis LRR receptor-like protein kinase, interacts with BRI1 and modulates brassinosteroid signaling. Cell 110:213–222PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Li YD, Chu ZZ, Liu XG, Jing HC, Liu YG, Hao DY (2010) A cost-effective high-resolution melting approach using the EvaGreen dye for DNA polymorphism detection and genotyping in plants. J Integr Plant Biol 52:1036–1042PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Livak KJ, Schmittgen TD (2001) Analysis of relative gene expression data using real-time quantitative PCR and the 2(-Delta Delta C(T)) method. Methods 25:402–408PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Matsuo T, Futsuhara Y, Kikuchi F, Yamaguchi H (1997) Science of the rice plant. Nobunkyo 3:302–303Google Scholar
  16. Monna L, Kitazawa N, Yoshino R, Suzuki J, Masuda H, Maehara Y, Tanji M, Sato M, Nasu S, Minobe Y (2002) Positional cloning of rice semidwarfing gene, sd-1: rice “green revolution gene” encodes a mutant enzyme involved in gibberellin synthesis. DNA Res 9:11–17PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Nam KH, Li J (2002) BRI1/BAK1, a receptor kinase pair mediating brassinosteroid signaling. Cell 110:203–212PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Nieuwland J, Feron R, Huisman BA, Fasolino A, Hilbers CW, Derksen J, Mariani C (2005) Lipid transfer proteins enhance cell wall extension in tobacco. Plant Cell 17:2009–2019PubMedCentralPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Nomoto Y, Kubozono S, Yamashino T, Nakamichi N, Mizuno T (2012) Circadian clock- and PIF4-controlled plant growth: a coincidence mechanism directly integrates a hormone signaling network into the photoperiodic control of plant architectures in Arabidopsis thaliana. Plant Cell Physiol 53:1950–1964PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Peng P, Li J (2003) Brassinosteroid signal transduction: a mix of conservation and novelty. J Plant Growth Regul 22:298–312PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Peng J, Carol P, Richards DE, King KE, Cowling RJ, Murphy GP, Harberd NP (1997) The Arabidopsis GAI gene defines a signaling pathway that negatively regulates gibberellin responses. Genes Dev 11:3194–3205PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Sakamoto T, Miura K, Itoh H, Tatsumi T, Ueguchi-Tanaka M, Ishiyama K, Kobayashi M, Agrawal GK, Takeda S, Abe K, Miyao A, Hirochika H, Kitano H, Ashikari M, Matsuoka M (2004) An overview of gibberellin metabolism enzyme genes and their related mutants in rice. Plant Physiol 134:1642–1653PubMedCentralPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Sasaki A, Ashikari M, Ueguchi-Tanaka M, Itoh H, Nishimura A, Swapan D, Ishiyama K, Saito T, Kobayashi M, Khush GS, Kitano H, Matsuoka M (2002) Green revolution: a mutant gibberellin-synthesis gene in rice. Nature 416:701–702PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Sasaki A, Itoh H, Gomi K, Ueguchi-Tanaka M, Ishiyama K, Kobayashi M, Jeong DH, An G, Kitano H, Ashikari M, Matsuoka M (2003) Accumulation of phosphorylated repressor for gibberellin signaling in an F-box mutant. Science 299:1896–1898PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Silverstone AL, Ciampaglio CN, Sun T (1998) The Arabidopsis RGA gene encodes a transcriptional regulator repressing the gibberellin signal transduction pathway. Plant Cell 10:155–169PubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  26. Spielmeyer W, Ellis MH, Chandler PM (2002) Semidwarf (sd-1), “green revolution” rice, contains a defective gibberellin 20-oxidase gene. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 99:9043–9048PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Stroud H, Ding B, Simon SA, Feng S, Bellizzi M, Pellegrini M, Wang GL, Meyers BC, Jacobsen SE (2013) Plants regenerated from tissue culture contain stable epigenome changes in rice. Elife 2:e354CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Sun TP (2011) The molecular mechanism and evolution of the GA-GID1-DELLA signaling module in plants. Curr Biol 21:R338–R345PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Ueguchi-Tanaka M, Ashikari M, Nakajima M, Itoh H, Katoh E, Kobayashi M, Chow TY, Hsing YI, Kitano H, Yamaguchi I, Matsuoka M (2005) GIBBERELLIN INSENSITIVE DWARF1 encodes a soluble receptor for gibberellin. Nature 437:693–698PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Wang X, Chory J (2006) Brassinosteroids regulate dissociation of BKI1, a negative regulator of BRI1 signaling, from the plasma membrane. Science 313:1118–1122PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Wang ZY, He JX (2004) Brassinosteroid signal transduction—choices of signals and receptors. Trends Plant Sci 9:91–96PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Wang Y, Li J (2008) Molecular basis of plant architecture. Annu Rev Plant Biol 59:253–279PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Wang ZY, Nakano T, Gendron J, He J, Chen M, Vafeados D, Yang Y, Fujioka S, Yoshida S, Asami T, Chory J (2002) Nuclear-localized BZR1 mediates brassinosteroid-induced growth and feedback suppression of brassinosteroid biosynthesis. Dev Cell 2:505–513PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Wang HW, Hwang SG, Karuppanapandian T, Liu A, Kim W, Jang CS (2012) Insight into the molecular evolution of non-specific lipid transfer proteins via comparative analysis between rice and sorghum. DNA Res 19:179–194PubMedCentralPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Wei X, Xu J, Guo H, Jiang L, Chen S, Yu C, Zhou Z, Hu P, Zhai H, Wan J (2010) DTH8 suppresses flowering in rice, influencing plant height and yield potential simultaneously. Plant Physiol 153:1747–1758PubMedCentralPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Xue W, Xing Y, Weng X, Zhao Y, Tang W, Wang L, Zhou H, Yu S, Xu C, Li X, Zhang Q (2008) Natural variation in Ghd7 is an important regulator of heading date and yield potential in rice. Nat Genet 40:761–767PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Yang CJ, Zhang C, Lu YN, Jin JQ, Wang XL (2011) The mechanisms of brassinosteroids’ action: from signal transduction to plant development. Mol Plant 4:588–600PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Yin Y, Wang ZY, Mora-Garcia S, Li J, Yoshida S, Asami T, Chory J (2002) BES1 accumulates in the nucleus in response to brassinosteroids to regulate gene expression and promote stem elongation. Cell 109:181–191PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Zhao J, Peng P, Schmitz RJ, Decker AD, Tax FE, Li J (2002) Two putative BIN2 substrates are nuclear components of brassinosteroid signaling. Plant Physiol 130:1221–1229PubMedCentralPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.State Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Subtropical Agro-bioresources, Key Laboratory of Plant Functional Genomics and Biotechnology of Guangdong Provincial Higher Education Institutions, College of Life SciencesSouth China Agricultural UniversityGuangzhouChina

Personalised recommendations