Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 126, Issue 4, pp 971–984 | Cite as

QTL for yield and associated traits in the Seri/Babax population grown across several environments in Mexico, in the West Asia, North Africa, and South Asia regions

  • Marta S. Lopes
  • Matthew P. Reynolds
  • C. Lynne McIntyre
  • Ky L. Mathews
  • M. R. Jalal Kamali
  • Moussa Mossad
  • Yousef Feltaous
  • Izzat S. A. Tahir
  • Ravish Chatrath
  • Francis Ogbonnaya
  • Michael Baum
Original Paper

Abstract

Heat and drought adaptive quantitative trait loci (QTL) in a spring bread wheat population resulting from the Seri/Babax cross designed to minimize confounding agronomic traits have been identified previously in trials conducted in Mexico. The same population was grown across a wide range of environments where heat and drought stress are naturally experienced including environments in Mexico, West Asia, North Africa (WANA), and South Asia regions. A molecular genetic linkage map including 475 marker loci associated to 29 linkage groups was used for QTL analysis of yield, days to heading (DH) and to maturity (DM), grain number (GM2), thousand kernel weight (TKW), plant height (PH), canopy temperature at the vegetative and grain filling stages (CTvg and CTgf), and early ground cover. A QTL for yield on chromosome 4A was confirmed across several environments, in subsets of lines with uniform allelic expression of a major phenology QTL, but not independently from PH. With terminal stress, TKW QTL was linked or pleiotropic to DH and DM. The link between phenology and TKW suggested that early maturity would favor the post—anthesis grain growth periods resulting in increased grain size and yields under terminal stress. GM2 and TKW were partially associated with markers at different positions suggesting different genetic regulation and room for improvement of both traits. Prediction accuracy of yield was improved by 5 % when using marker scores of component traits (GM2 and DH) together with yield in multiple regression. This procedure may provide accumulation of more favorable alleles during selection.

Keywords

Quantitative Trait Locus Plant Height Major Quantitative Trait Locus Quantitative Trait Locus Effect Thousand Kernel Weight 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Authors would like to thank Mayra Barcelo, Araceli Torres and Eugenio Perez for assistance with data and trial management. Editing assistance was received from Emma Quilligan. The German Federal Ministry for Economy Cooperation and Development (BMZ) and the Australian Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) are acknowledged for their financial support.

Supplementary material

122_2012_2030_MOESM1_ESM.xlsx (15 kb)
Supplementary material 1 Multi-environment QTL and percentage of variation accounted for yield (YLD), thousand kernel weight (TKW), grain number (GM2), days to heading and maturity (DH and DM), plant height (PH), canopy temperature at the vegetative and grain filling stages (CTvg and CTgf), and early ground cover (EGC) analysed for each trait at the time across all environments (ENV). Marker, chromosome (Chr), position (Pos), QTL by environment interactions (QTLxE), and additive effects in each environment are shown (positive effects refer to the Seri parent whereas negative additive effects refer to the Babax parent). Environments include Darab (Dar), Sohag (Soh), Dongola (Don), Wad Medani (WD), Tel Hadya (THa), Mexico irrigated (MIR), Mexico drought (MD), Mexico heat (MH), Mexico heat plus drought (MHD), Karnal (Kar), and Ludihana (Lud). NA, not available. Figures in bold indicate significant QTL effects in one particular environment. (XLSX 15 kb)
122_2012_2030_MOESM2_ESM.xlsx (16 kb)
Supplementary material 2 Multi –trait QTL effects and percentage of variation accounted for yield (YLD), thousand kernel weight (TKW), grain number (GM2), days to heading and maturity (DH and DM), plant height (PH), canopy temperature at the vegetative and grain filling stages (CTgf), and early ground cover (EGC) analysed for each environment at the time across all traits (multi-trait, single environment). Marker, chromosome (Chr), position (Pos), and additive effects for traits in each environment (ENV) are shown (positive effects refer to the Seri parent whereas negative additive effects refer to the Babax parent). Environments include Mexico irrigated (MIR), Mexico drought (MD), Mexico heat (MH), and Mexico heat plus drought (MHD). NA, not available. Figures in bold indicate significant QTL effects in one particular environment. (XLSX 16 kb)
122_2012_2030_MOESM3_ESM.xlsx (15 kb)
Supplementary material 3 Multi-trait QTL effects and percentage of variation accounted for yield (YLD), thousand kernel weight (TKW), grain number (GM2), days to heading and maturity (DH and DM), plant height (PH), canopy temperature at the vegetative and grain filling stages (CTvg and CTgf), and early ground cover (EGC) analysed for each environment (ENV) at the time across all traits (multi-trait, single environment) using sister lines containing the Seri allele for marker 7D-acc/cat-10 on chromosome 7D-b. Marker, chromosome (Chr), position (Pos), and additive effects for each trait in each environment are shown (positive effects refer to the Seri parent whereas negative additive effects refer to the Babax parent). Environments include Mexico irrigated (MIR), Mexico drought (MD), Mexico heat (MH), and Mexico heat plus drought (MHD). NA, not available. Figures in bold indicate significant QTL effects in one particular environment. (XLSX 14 kb)
122_2012_2030_MOESM4_ESM.xlsx (13 kb)
Supplementary material 4 Multi –trait QTL effects and percentage of variation accounted for yield (YLD), thousand kernel weight (TKW), grain number (GM2), days to heading and maturity (DH and DM), plant height (PH), canopy temperature at the vegetative, and grain filling stages (CTvg and CTgf) and early ground cover (EGC) analysed for each environment (ENV) at the time across all traits (multi-trait, single environment) using sister lines containing the Babax allele for marker 7D-acc/cat-10 on chromosome 7D-b. Locus, linkage group (LG), position (Pos), and additive effects for each trait in each environment are shown (positive effects refer to the Seri parent whereas negative additive effects refer to the Babax parent). Environments included Mexico irrigated (MIR), Mexico drought (MD), Mexico heat (MH), and Mexico heat plus drought (MHD). NA, not available. Figures in bold indicate significant QTL effects in one particular environment. (XLSX 13 kb)
122_2012_2030_MOESM5_ESM.xlsx (13 kb)
Supplementary material 5 Marker scores of genotype SBS 21 (high yielding) and SBS 205 (low yielding) associated with QTL for yield (YLD), thousand kernel weight (TKW), grain number (GM2), days to heading and maturity (DH and DM), plant height (PH), canopy temperature at the vegetative and grain filling stages (CTvg and CTgf), and early ground cover (EGC). Trait, marker, chromosome (Chr), position (Pos), and QTL by environment interaction (QTLxE) are shown. Scores 1 and 2 refer to the Seri and Babax parent, respectively. Additives effects (Add.Eff) for each genotype according to the observed allele, predicted QTL effects (Pred.QTL as the sum of all additive effects for each trait) and observed values for each trait (OBS VAL) are presented. (XLSX 12 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marta S. Lopes
    • 1
  • Matthew P. Reynolds
    • 1
  • C. Lynne McIntyre
    • 2
  • Ky L. Mathews
    • 1
  • M. R. Jalal Kamali
    • 3
  • Moussa Mossad
    • 4
  • Yousef Feltaous
    • 4
  • Izzat S. A. Tahir
    • 5
    • 7
  • Ravish Chatrath
    • 6
  • Francis Ogbonnaya
    • 7
  • Michael Baum
    • 7
  1. 1.CIMMYT Int. Apdo.DF MexicoMexico
  2. 2.CSIRO Plant Industry, Queensland Biosciences PrecinctSt LuciaAustralia
  3. 3.CIMMYT, c/o Seed and Plant Improvement Institute Campus (SPII)KarajIran
  4. 4.Field Crops Research InstituteAgricultural Research CenterGizaEgypt
  5. 5.ARCWad MedaniSudan
  6. 6.Directorate of Wheat Research (DWR)KarnalIndia
  7. 7.ICARDAAleppoSyria

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