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Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 111, Issue 5, pp 941–948 | Cite as

Development and characterization of wheat- Leymus racemosus translocation lines with resistance to Fusarium Head Blight

  • Peidu Chen
  • Wenxuan Liu
  • Jianhua Yuan
  • Xiue Wang
  • Bo Zhou
  • Suling Wang
  • Shouzhong Zhang
  • Yigao Feng
  • Baojun Yang
  • Guangxin Liu
  • Dajun Liu
  • Lili Qi
  • Peng Zhang
  • Bernd Friebe
  • Bikram S Gill
Original Paper

Abstract

Wheat scab (Fusarium Head Blight, FHB) is a destructive disease in the warm and humid wheat-growing areas of the world. Finding diverse sources of FHB resistance is critical for genetic diversity of resistance for wheat breeding programs. Leymus racemosus is a wild perennial relative of wheat and is highly resistant to FHB. Three wheat- L. racemosus disomic addition (DA) lines DA5Lr#1, DA7Lr#1 and DALr.7 resistant to FHB were used to develop wheat- L.racemosus translocation lines through irradiation and gametocidal gene-induced chromosome breakage. A total of nine wheat-alien translocation lines with wheat scab resistance were identified by chromosome C-banding, GISH, telosomic pairing and RFLP analyses. In line NAU614, the long arm of 5Lr#1 was translocated to wheat chromosome 6B. Four lines, NAU601, NAU615, NAU617, and NAU635, had a part of the short arm of 7Lr#1 transferred to different wheat chromosomes. Four other lines, NAU611, NAU634, NAU633, and NAU618, contained translocations involving Leymus chromosome Lr.7 and different wheat chromosomes. The resistance level of the translocation lines with a single alien chromosome segment was higher than the susceptible wheat parent Chinese Spring but lower than the alien resistant parent L. racemosus. At least three resistance genes in L. racemosus were identified. One was located on chromosome Lr.7, and two could be assigned to the long arm of 5Lr#1 and the short arm of 7Lr#1.

Keywords

Wheat Chromosome Fusarium Head Blight Resistance Translocation Line Scab Resistance Alien Chromosome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank Dr. Endo, Kyoto University, Japan, for providing seeds of wheat- Ae.cylindrica addition line; the Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences for irradiation treatment and supplying the pathogen isolates of Fusarium graminearum; Jianyang Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Fujian province for identification of the scab resistance; and John Raupp and Duane Wilson for research assistance. The project was supported by the National Natural Sciences of China, the Jiangsu Natural Science Foundation, Education Ministry of China and McKnight Foundation (USA) CCRP grant to Nanjing Agricultural University and Kansas State University.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peidu Chen
    • 1
  • Wenxuan Liu
    • 1
  • Jianhua Yuan
    • 1
  • Xiue Wang
    • 1
  • Bo Zhou
    • 1
  • Suling Wang
    • 1
  • Shouzhong Zhang
    • 1
  • Yigao Feng
    • 1
  • Baojun Yang
    • 1
  • Guangxin Liu
    • 1
  • Dajun Liu
    • 1
  • Lili Qi
    • 2
  • Peng Zhang
    • 2
  • Bernd Friebe
    • 2
  • Bikram S Gill
    • 2
  1. 1.The National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Germplasm EnhancementNanjing Agricultural UniversityNanjingChina
  2. 2.The Wheat Genetics Resource Center, Department of Plant PathologyKansas State UniversityManhattanUSA

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