Skip to main content
Log in

Von der Neuromyelitis optica zur Neuromyelitis-optica-Spektrum-Erkrankung: vom klinischen Syndrom zur Klassifikation

From neuromyelitis optica to neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder: from clinical syndrome to diagnistic classification

  • Leitthema
  • Published:
Der Nervenarzt Aims and scope Submit manuscript

Zusammenfassung

Die Neuromyelitis-optica-Spektrum-Erkrankung („neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder“, NMOSD) – abgeleitet von NMO oder „Devic-Syndrom“ – wird seit Entdeckung des Anti-Aquaporin-4-Serumantikörpers (AQP4-IgG) als eigenständige Erkrankung angesehen und von der klassischen Multiplen Sklerose (MS) abgegrenzt. Mit kontinuierlicher Erweiterung der Kenntnisse über die klinischen Manifestationen wurde aus dem engeren Diagnosebegriff NMO der Begriff NMOSD, welcher seit 2015 auch in den Diagnosekriterien verwendet wird. Die aktuellen Diagnosekriterien erlauben die frühe Diagnose einer NMOSD bei Patienten mit und ohne AQP4-IgG. Klinisch typische Manifestation stellen dabei die Beteiligung von Rückenmark, Sehnerv und Hirnstamm dar. Nicht selten kommt es im Rahmen der NMOSD zu neuropathischen Schmerzen, schmerzhaften tonischen Spasmen oder auch anderen ungewöhnlichen Manifestationen. Insbesondere bei der AQP4-IgG-positiven NMOSD wird das gemeinsame Auftreten mit anderen Autoimmunerkrankungen häufig beobachtet. Die NMOSD verläuft in der Mehrzahl schubförmig, mit teils jahrelangen schubfreien Intervallen und kann sich auch erst im hohen Erwachsenenalter manifestieren. Von den AQP4-IgG-seronegativen Patienten müssen Patienten mit Antikörpern gegen das Myelinoligodendrozytenglykoprotein (MOG) abgegrenzt werden: diese MOG-IgG-assoziierten Erkrankungen (MOGAD) lassen sich klinisch-syndromal sowohl der NMOSD als auch der MS zuordnen und sind derzeit Gegenstand intensiver Forschung.

Abstract

Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), derived from NMO or Devic’s disease, is considered as a distinct disease since the discovery of a novel and pathogenic serum autoantibody targeting aquaporin‑4 (AQP4-IgG) and is distinguished from classical multiple sclerosis (MS). With the continuous extension of knowledge on the clinical manifestations, the previously narrow diagnostic term NMO became NMOSD, which has also been used in the diagnostic criteria since 2015. The current diagnostic criteria enable the early diagnosis of NMOSD in patients with and without AQP4-IgG. Typical clinical manifestations include involvement of the spinal cord, optic nerve and brainstem. Typically patients with the disease also present with neuropathic pain, painful tonic spasms and also other unusual manifestations in NMOSD. Especially in AQP4-IgG positive NMOSD patients, the coexistence with other autoimmune diseases is frequently observed. In most cases NMOSD follows a relapsing course with exacerbation-free periods sometimes lasting years and can be manifested first in advanced adulthood. A subset of AQP4-IgG negative NMOSD patients have been found to harbor autoantibodies targeting myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), which is considered as a distinct disease entity: these MOG antibody-associated disorders (MOGAD) can present with clinical syndromes resembling both NMOSD and MS and are currently the subject of intensive research.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this article

Subscribe and save

Springer+ Basic
EUR 32.99 /Month
  • Get 10 units per month
  • Download Article/Chapter or Ebook
  • 1 Unit = 1 Article or 1 Chapter
  • Cancel anytime
Subscribe now

Buy Now

Price excludes VAT (USA)
Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout.

Instant access to the full article PDF.

Abb. 1
Abb. 2
Abb. 3
Abb. 4

Literatur

  1. Aktas O, Wattjes MP, Stangel M et al (2018) Diagnose der Multiplen Sklerose: Revision der McDonald-Kriterien 2017 (Diagnosis of multiple sclerosis: revision of the McDonald criteria 2017). Nervenarzt 89(12):1344–1354

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  2. Apiwattanakul M, Popescu BF, Matiello M et al (2010) Intractable vomiting as the initial presentation of neuromyelitis optica. Ann Neurol 68(5):757–761

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  3. Asseyer S, Cooper G, Paul F (2020) Pain in NMOSD and MOGAD: a systematic literature review of pathophysiology, symptoms, and current treatment strategies. Front Neurol 11:778

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  4. Bradl M, Kanamori Y, Nakashima I et al (2014) Pain in neuromyelitis optica—prevalence, pathogenesis and therapy. Nat Rev Neurol 10(9):529–536

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  5. Collongues N, Cabre P, Marignier R et al (2011) A benign form of neuromyelitis optica: does it exist? Arch Neurol 68(7):918–924

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  6. Elsone L, Townsend T, Mutch K et al (2013) Neuropathic pruritus (itch) in neuromyelitis optica. Mult Scler 19(4):475–479

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  7. Fujiwara S, Manabe Y, Morihara R et al (2020) Two cases of very-late-onset neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) in patients over the age of 80. Case Rep Neurol 12(1):13–17

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  8. Gombolay GY, Chitnis T (2018) Pediatric neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders. Curr Treat Options Neurol 20(6):19

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  9. Gratton S, Amjad F, Ghavami F et al (2014) Bilateral hearing loss as a manifestation of neuromyelitis optica. Neurology 82(23):2145–2146

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  10. Hor JY, Asgari N, Nakashima I et al (2020) Epidemiology of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder and its prevalence and incidence worldwide. Front Neurol 11:501

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  11. Jarius S, Paul F, Aktas O et al (2018) MOG-Enzephalomyelitis: Internationale Empfehlungen zu Diagnose und Antikörpertestung (MOG encephalomyelitis: international recommendations on diagnosis and antibody testing). Nervenarzt 89(12):1388–1399

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  12. Jarius S, Ruprecht K, Kleiter I et al (2016) MOG-IgG in NMO and related disorders: a multicenter study. Part 1: frequency, syndrome specificity, influence of disease activity, long-term course, association with AQP4-IgG, and origin. J Neuroinflammation 13:279

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  13. Jarius S, Ruprecht K, Kleiter I et al (2016) MOG-IgG in NMO and related disorders: a multicenter study of 50 patients. Part 2: epidemiology, clinical presentation, radiological and laboratory features, treatment responses, and long-term outcome. J Neuroinflammation 131:280

    Article  Google Scholar 

  14. Jarius S, Paul F, Franciotta D et al (2012) Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders in patients with myasthenia gravis: ten new aquaporin‑4 antibody positive cases and a review of the literature. Mult Scler 18(8):1135–1143

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  15. Jarius S, Ruprecht K, Wildemann B et al (2012) Contrasting disease patterns in seropositive and seronegative neuromyelitis optica: a multicentre study of 175 patients. J Neuroinflammation 9:14

    Article  CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  16. Jarius S, Wildemann B (2013) The history of neuromyelitis optica. J Neuroinflammation 10:8

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  17. Jarius S, Wildemann B (2019) The history of neuromyelitis optica. Part 2: ‘spinal amaurosis’, or how it all began. J Neuroinflammation 16(1):280

    Article  CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  18. Jonsson DI, Sveinsson O, Hakim R et al (2019) Epidemiology of NMOSD in Sweden from 1987 to 2013: a nationwide population-based study. Neurology 93(2):e181–e189

    Article  CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  19. Kleiter I, Gahlen A, Borisow N et al (2016) Neuromyelitis optica: evaluation of 871 attacks and 1,153 treatment courses. Ann Neurol 79(2):206–216

    Article  CAS  Google Scholar 

  20. Krumbholz M, Hofstadt-van Oy U, Angstwurm K et al (2015) Very late-onset neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder beyond the age of 75. J Neurol 262(5):1379–1384

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  21. Leite MI, Coutinho E, Lana-Peixoto M et al (2012) Myasthenia gravis and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder: a multicenter study of 16 patients. Neurology 78(20):1601–1607

    Article  CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  22. Lennon VA, Kryzer TJ, Pittock SJ et al (2005) IgG marker of optic-spinal multiple sclerosis binds to the aquaporin‑4 water channel. J Exp Med 202(4):473–477

    Article  CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  23. Lennon VA, Wingerchuk DM, Kryzer TJ et al (2004) A serum autoantibody marker of neuromyelitis optica: distinction from multiple sclerosis. Lancet 364(9451):2106–2112

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  24. Lucchinetti CF, Mandler RN, McGavern D et al (2002) A role for humoral mechanisms in the pathogenesis of Devic’s neuromyelitis optica. Brain 125(Pt 7):1450–1461

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  25. Mathew T, Nadimpally US, Sarma GRK et al (2016) Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia as a presenting feature of neuromyelitis optica: “a rare combination of two uncommon disorders”. Mult Scler Relat Disord 6:73–74

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  26. Netravathi M, Saini J, Mahadevan A et al (2017) Is pruritus an indicator of aquaporin-positive neuromyelitis optica? Mult Scler 23(6):810–817

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  27. Reindl M, Waters P (2019) Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies in neurological disease. Nat Rev Neurol 15(2):89–102

    Article  CAS  Google Scholar 

  28. Ringelstein M, Metz I, Ruprecht K et al (2014) Contribution of spinal cord biopsy to diagnosis of aquaporin‑4 antibody positive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. Mult Scler 20(7):882–888

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  29. Roemer SF, Parisi JE, Lennon VA et al (2007) Pattern-specific loss of aquaporin‑4 immunoreactivity distinguishes neuromyelitis optica from multiple sclerosis. Brain 130(Pt 5):1194–1205

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  30. Roy U, Saini DS, Pan K, Pandit A, Ganguly G, Panwar A (2016) Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder with tumefactive demyelination mimicking multiple sclerosis: a rare case. Front Neurol 7:73

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  31. Seok JM, Cho H‑J, Ahn S‑W et al (2017) Clinical characteristics of late-onset neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder: a multicenter retrospective study in korea. Mult Scler 23(13):1748–1756

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  32. Sepúlveda M, Armangué T, Sola-Valls N et al (2016) Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders: comparison according to the phenotype and serostatus. Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm 3(3):e225

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  33. Stellmann J‑P, Krumbholz M, Friede T et al (2017) Immunotherapies in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder: efficacy and predictors of response. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 88(8):639–647

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  34. Suchdev K, Razmjou S, Venkatachalam P et al (2017) Late onset neuromyelitis optica mimicking an acute stroke in an elderly patient. J Neuroimmunol 309:1–3

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  35. Thompson AJ, Banwell BL, Barkhof F et al (2018) Diagnosis of multiple sclerosis: 2017 revisions of the McDonald criteria. Lancet Neurol 17(2):162–173

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  36. Titulaer MJ, Höftberger R, Iizuka T et al (2014) Overlapping demyelinating syndromes and anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis. Ann Neurol 75(3):411–428

    Article  CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  37. Trebst C, Kümpfel T (2018) Neuroimmunologie und Rheumatologie: Schnittmengen und Differenzialdiagnosen (Neuroimmunology and rheumatology: overlap and differential diagnoses). Nervenarzt 89(10):1095–1105

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  38. Trebst C, Raab P, Voss EV et al (2011) Longitudinal extensive transverse myelitis—it’s not all neuromyelitis optica. Nat Rev Neurol 7(12):688–698

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  39. Weinshenker BG, Wingerchuk DM, Nakashima I et al (2006) OSMS is NMO, but not MS: proven clinically and pathologically. Lancet Neurol 5(2):110–111

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  40. Wingerchuk DM, Banwell B, Bennett JL et al (2015) International consensus diagnostic criteria for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders. Neurology 85(2):177–189

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  41. Wingerchuk DM, Hogancamp WF, O’Brien PC et al (1999) The clinical course of neuromyelitis optica (Devic’s syndrome). Neurology 53(5):1107–1114

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  42. Wingerchuk DM, Lennon VA, Lucchinetti CF et al (2007) The spectrum of neuromyelitis optica. Lancet Neurol 6(9):805–815

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  43. Wingerchuk DM, Lennon VA, Pittock SJ et al (2006) Revised diagnostic criteria for neuromyelitis optica. Neurology 66(10):1485–1489

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

Download references

Förderung

Erkenntnisse zu Neuromyelitis-optica-Spektrum-Erkrankungen werden in Deutschland von der Neuromyelitis optica Studiengruppe (NEMOS) erforscht, mit der Unterstützung des Fördervereins NEMOS e.V. Die Arbeiten von Orhan Aktas und Tania Kümpfel im Bereich der Neuromyelitis-optica-Spektrum-Erkrankungen (NationNMO-Kohorte) wurden im Rahmen der 3. Förderperiode des Kompetenznetzes Multiple Sklerose (KKNMS) vom Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung gefördert (FKZ 01GI1602B).

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Tania Kümpfel.

Ethics declarations

Interessenkonflikt

O. Aktas erhielt finanzielle Unterstützung für Reisen, Vortragstätigkeit und/oder Advisory Boards von Alexion, Bayer Healthcare, Biogen, Teva Pharma, Merck, Novartis, Roche, Sanofi-Aventis/Genzyme, sowie Unterstützung für wissenschaftliche Projekte von Biogen und Novartis. Dies hatte keinen Einfluss auf die vorliegende Arbeit. T. Kümpfel erhielt finanzielle Unterstützung für Reisen, Vortragstätigkeit und/oder Advisory boards von Bayer Healthcare, Teva Pharma, Merck, Novartis Pharma, Sanofi-Aventis/Genzyme, CLB Behring, Roche Pharma and Biogen sowie Unterstützung für wissenschaftliche Projekte von Bayer-Schering AG, Novartis and Chugai Pharma. Dies hatte keinen Einfluss auf die vorliegende Arbeit.

Für diesen Beitrag wurden von den Autoren keine Studien an Menschen oder Tieren durchgeführt. Für die aufgeführten Studien gelten die jeweils dort angegebenen ethischen Richtlinien.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

About this article

Check for updates. Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Aktas, O., Kümpfel, T. Von der Neuromyelitis optica zur Neuromyelitis-optica-Spektrum-Erkrankung: vom klinischen Syndrom zur Klassifikation. Nervenarzt 92, 307–316 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00115-021-01098-w

Download citation

  • Accepted:

  • Published:

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00115-021-01098-w

Schlüsselwörter

Keywords

Navigation